Wedding season and Kodak Picture Kiosk

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It’s wedding season and I was fortunate to attend two so far. The first one was my little sister’s. Of course I show up with my camera. Now both of the weddings had a professional photographer. You don’t want to leave the pictures of an event like this to your sister who might get distracted by the cake *ahem* and miss the big shot. Always invest in a pro photographer who will make sure every moment is captured beautifully for you to remember for years to come.

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I like to take pictures myself so I have something to post to Facebook and make prints for the fridge right away.

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This past weekend I went to the lake-side nuptuals of my friends Taylor and Andrew. What a great backdrop for photos of the bride and groom!

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I especially like taking photos of the wedding details… flowers, table settings, cake, dresses… even the bride’s nails and shoes! I think it’s because I know how much work goes into making those elements of the big day special.

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Again with the flowers. I like to get close ups of these beauties.

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Sometimes I can’t wait to get home and look at the pictures I captured of the happy couple! I pick the best for Facebook and then I start printing! Kodak Picture Kiosk has lots of choices for creative ways to use those wedding photos.

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I made a collage of pictures I took at my sister’s bridal shower. You can choose to let the Kiosk auto fill all the spots or fill them yourself. Either way you can still move them around and edit each picture until it is just right. I love these for framing or hanging on the fridge or at the office. It looks much tidier than nine separate photos.

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Our grandmother couldn’t make the wedding so I made prints in order for to see all the activity. You have the option to add a border to your prints which make them frame-ready or just add a little extra something to where ever you might display them. There are plenty of borders to choose from so it can compliment the photo.

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Naturally photo books are great for remembering a wedding. My sister is moving overseas and has a lot to pack so I made her a wee little photo book that won’t take up much room.

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Here is something you can make the newlyweds that they will really love. Use photos of their wedding to make a calendar. I made this one page calendar which is nice for pinning to a corkboard message center. A twelve page monthly calendar would be really nice too. Fun for the couple to look at throughout their first year of marriage!

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This is one of the coolest things I think you can make at a Kodak Picture Kiosk… a canvas print! These turn out super cute and ready to hang, no need for a frame. It has a painterly aspect to it. I can’t wait to give this one to the newlyweds!

To make any of these photo gifts check here to find a Kiosk near you that makes that particular product.

I have also pinned lots of great wedding photo projects on Pinterest that you can repin too!

Josh Moates and Indie Film Lab

Josh Moates, photographer and founder of Indie Film Lab in Montgomery, shares why he got into the film processing game and how a business decision has impacted his art.

I’ve been taking pictures since my mom gave me a 35mm camera for Christmas when I was in high school and for the last 10 years, it’s how I’ve made my living. When I re-discovered film in 2004, it changed the way I thought about photography, and then it changed my business.

A big chunk of my work is weddings, which I love shooting. But in Alabama, I couldn’t charge enough to make shooting film for my clients a truly cost effective option.

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Still, I couldn’t shake my belief that shooting film for an occasion as special as a wedding was important to me and to my clients. We all know the quality of film photos outshines that of digital, and for me, the quality of my composition is better when I’m shooting film.  It stokes my creativity, and not just when shooting happy couples. I have been a 100% Kodak shooter for years because of the new PORTRA line and the classic look of TRI-X.

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When shooting weddings, I use Kodak’s PORTRA color negative films because how easily they scan and how amazing the colors are. The skin tones are truly the best of all the other film brands I have shot. Especially the new Portra 800 – it’s super awesome for lower light situations.  Thank goodness for that film, it has saved me in so many hard to shoot situations.

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And I love, love love TRI-X for black and white; it has the most classic look of any black and white film. When I look at a TRI-X photograph, it almost looks like it has a soul. I keep it loaded in my Leica M6. Not to mention it is the most versatile film ever. It can be shot at pretty much any speed. I mainly push it to 1600, but I have shot it at 3200 with great results.

I enjoy photographing anything that relates to Southern culture and history—landscapes, architecture and people. But my favorite subjects are always people. Trying to capture someone’s personality in a split second and then share that moment is a challenge that keeps me coming back.

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When I look into the faces of my portrait photos done on film, I see an added layer of depth, a layer that enhances and underscores what I’m trying to express.

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The point is I wasn’t going to stop shooting film. Instead, I decided to find a way to make it work for me. So I took a leap, gathered some partners, and we bought our own lab equipment and scanner. Kim Box, my partner in my photography company, came onboard, as did my shooting assistant, Asheley Willet, who is absolutely integral to the process. He has a degree in chemistry from the University of Alabama and is the technical guru who makes everything come out just right.

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The original intent was to just process our own film and let the equipment pay for itself. Once we started, we were really happy with the results and shared some shots on a Facebook film shooters’ group. “Who did your lab work?” kept popping up in response to our posts. When I told those asking that we did, they wanted us to process their film too. The light bulb turned on overhead, and I saw a void in the film-processing market just waiting to be filled.

To process the film, we use Kodak Flexicolor chemistry in our color processors and Duraflo RT in the BW machines. The chemistry has been consistent and very stable and we depend on it to deliver top notch negatives for our clients day in and day out. We figure why not use the best chemistry we can get.

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In response, in 2012, we created Indie Film Lab, and in less than a year, it has grown into one of the largest film-processing labs of its type in the world. We had some growing pains initially, but we’re moving full-steam ahead.

Indie Film Lab is more than a successful start-up company. It began as a business decision, but it has moved far beyond that for me. Now, it is my way to play a part in the film community and in the renaissance of film, and as a huge film fan, that’s just cool.

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Shooting film again has re-awakened my passion for photography, and I suspect it has done the same for many others who started in photography when digital was “king”. I love that now my company is a resource for other artists that shoot film and that we give them a great product. There aren’t many things that give me more satisfaction than doing what I love, on my terms, and being successful doing it.

So I guess the morals of my story if you’re looking for some, are: Don’t be afraid to walk through the doors life opens for you; if you’ve got a great idea, push to make it happen; and never underestimate the value of good partners.

Indie Film Labs road tripped to Vegas and WPPI the 2nd week in March, documenting their adventures with Kodak film. You can see the team’s journey on Instagram, Facebook and on Twitter @IndieFilmLab1

Click here to find more information on Indie Film Lab online.