Sharing Our Images – post from Reid Callanan

“We’ve enjoyed a long relationship with the Santa Fe Workshop, led by Reid Callanan and we’re thrilled to have a blog post from him today. Reid’s passion for photography is matched only by his desire to help others become better at it. In addition to the many workshops his organization runs, he runs Photo Teens, which introduces young adults to the world of photography. Reid tells us a bit more about the program, and why film is an important part of that  workshop.” – Audrey

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When I was a young man (40 years ago) I grew up in a photographic world of film and black-and-white prints made in a darkroom. I learned the craft of photography getting my hands wet. Fast forward to 2013, and today’s youth are growing up in photographic universe almost completely unrecognizable from a technology standpoint. Their world of pictures is a digital one using cell phones to post their pictures to Facebook and Instagram. What a world of difference in a few short years!

At the same time, young adults who work with film are continually amazed by the experience and results, and react to photography created with film much differently from that created via digital. As director of the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops, I believe in getting teens excited about photography by watching an image rise and take form in a tray of developer and sharing the resulting print with their friends face-to-face. For this very reason, we teach our Photo Teens summer workshop program using film and printing paper. These silver-halide materials and the uniquely magical process in the darkroom excites and inspires these teen’s creativity and self expression unlike anything in their digital domain. This traditional photographic start opens an entirely new world for their dreams and visions.

Kodak Alaris has been a long-time supporter of our Photo Teens workshops over the past ten years and their materials have enabled our teens’ photographic vision to come to light. Here are a few images made by the participants in this summer’s Photo Teens workshop here in Santa Fe:

Michelle La Sage Ryan Williamson Sharing images is at the core of being a photographer, whether making silver prints or digital images. One fun and rewarding way to share our images is entering photography contests. Entering contests affords us an opportunity to evaluate our images and choose our best work. Then we get to see if our best work is considered by the contest judges to be the best work submitted. Being recognized and acknowledged for our best work is a rewarding experience for any photographer. And if we are so honored, we get to share our best work around the world. And the prizes are nice too.

AlmaValdezGarcia AlmaValdezGarcia2 Sarah_Surprise

Our upcoming photo contest from the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops is themed BACKYARD and will run from September 19 through November 19. Kodak Alaris has generously provided professional film as prizes for all four major contest winners, and we have provided free workshops, and many other photographic companies have provided prizes as well. Check out the details for BACKYARD here http://www.santafeworkshops.com/contest/.

Reid Callanan Director,
Santa Fe Photographic Workshops

Retail merchandising – Improving the customer experience

Ahh… the shopping experience, so fun and rewarding.  Retail therapy is a proven fact.  Consumers love to shop and buy, and they will if the shopping experience is a pleasant one and guides them on a journey to purchase.  Too frequently however, retail escape is cluttered and confusing.  The product sought is muddled and mired in a wealth of communication, and eventually, the consumer becomes overwhelmed, raises the white flag, and walks out.

Retailers seem to have approached merchandising one of two ways – either focusing on a broad assortment encouraging the impulse purchase and creating a busy environment, or adopting the “clean store policy” making it easy on the eyes, hard to navigate.  There is middle ground though, a solution to feature multiple products, create inspiration and drive purchase, but in a pragmatic and engaging process.  And the key word is process.  Marketers love processes, matrixes, grids, and funnels – like the path to purchase, the consumer buying cycle, the loyalty loop, etc. But often, we get so excited about communication real estate and products that we push aside well-worn practices in favor of promoting depth and breadth.  All that product promotion can be as overwhelming as a circular on Thanksgiving Day.

Here are some simple principles that create a communication process for in-store merchandising. These principles can offer a more engaging and profitable environment by increasing conversion, up selling, and bringing shoppers back for a repeat experience:

  1. Announce – Let consumers know what you have to offer in the simplest and broadest terms.  What is your core competency? Printing photos? Photo Center.  Fixing watches?  Watch Repair.  Selling Tickets?  Ticket Booth.  This communication attracts consumers who may not know these products and services are available in your store.
  2. Amplify – Tell consumers more about what your product offers, the features and benefits.  Take this opportunity to UP SELL and INSPIRE – prints instantly, create photo books, watch repair in an hour – new watches for sale.  Tickets to shows AND exclusive merchandise from of the show.  Now that consumers are aware and considering a purchase, make it the best sales experience possible.
  3. Inform – Close the sale by providing, detail clearly and concisely.  Pricing should be easy to follow.  If you have other products to promote, present it in a relatable and compelling communication.  Consumers are ready to buy, but will abandon the purchase if they get frustrated.

So the process seems pretty simple – only three steps(!). Now where does the communication fit it?  Below are examples of in-store marketing tactics and messaging:

Announce – ceiling signs, cross-promotional collateral (shelf talkers, stickering), department signs.  Messaging: define the destination and make the destination intriguing

Amplify – backwall signs, countertop signs.   Messaging: claims, product assortment, inspiration – end benefits, promotions, special offers

Inform – brochures, sales associates, pricing lists, QR codes/links to informational websites, samples.  Messaging: pricing, education on product benefits, instructional – how to use

Below is an example of an in-store environment, from a retail partner who provided us with the opportunity to apply these principles to its photo center.

Before:StoreBefore 

After (rendering): after2

after1

Key Improvements:

Announce:

  • Disruptive branding that defines space and creates a store within a store destination
  • Clear department name
  • Destination definition

Amplify:

  • Backwall features promotional messaging, menu pricing, and samples
  • Front counter image offers lifestyle/inspirational images and additional product information
  • Counter top sign features special offer

Inform:

  • On kiosk signage and UI provides additional product information, educational and instructional content

The principles, applied to a larger in-store footprint, can be applied to a countertop merchandiser just as easily.  There might be a more selective approach on what key points of communication are conveyed, but if you follow the communication process consumers will engage and you will be rewarded.

Meet Kodak Alaris

alaris

Today marks the beginning of a bright new future for us in Personalized Imaging and Document Imaging, as we unveil Kodak Alaris. The new company and its name preserve the heritage and legacy of the Kodak brand, while embodying the greater speed and agility of a nimble company that will meet market needs and changes.

As you know, earlier this spring, Eastman Kodak Company announced it would sell our Personalized Imaging and Document Imaging businesses to the U.K. Kodak Pension Plan. Today, as that sale completes and we introduce our new company, we reflect proudly upon our heritage within Eastman Kodak Company, but even more importantly, look forward to a bright new future as Kodak Alaris.

Kodak Alaris’ Personalized Imaging combines a unique heritage, expertise and market leading positions, and includes four businesses:

  • Film Capture, which includes some of the world’s most popular and recognizable award-winning still film for professionals and consumers;
  • RSS, a worldwide leader in instant printing with the retail instant photo kiosks offering consumers personalised photo products and the industry-leading APEX dry labs;
  • Paper and Output Systems, the broadest portfolio of high quality media, including traditional photographic paper, for a variety of professional print operations and workflow solutions for photo specialty retailers, professional and wholesale labs; and
  • EIS, the leading provider of digital souvenir photography services and solutions  at theme parks, iconic destinations & resorts

The introduction of Kodak Alaris marks the first step toward becoming a more dynamic company focused on improved innovation, faster time-to-market, stronger customer service, and sustainable, profitable growth.  We will continue to deliver the industry leading products and services that you know and trust.

We will also deliver these products and services under the Kodak brand. This means you will still see “KODAK Picture Kiosk, “KODAK PROFESSIONAL Film,” “KODAK PROFESSIONAL ENDURA Media,” and “KODAK Express,” among others.

With our industry heritage, people, products and solutions, I’m confident that together we will deliver on our vision for Kodak Alaris. We will make it easy for you to enrich, share and re-live your moments, your stories, your memories, your life. We will achieve this because:

  • Kodak Alaris’ Personalized Imaging is a successful and profitable business – still with the world’s foremost imaging brand and now with a long-term investor providing a strong platform for future growth.
  • Kodak Alaris’ Personalized Imaging has a fantastic and synergistic portfolio of market leading products, which span RSS, POS, EI and FC.
  • Kodak Alaris’ Personalized Imaging is committed to bringing innovative new solutions to the consumer imaging space that provide the best consumer experience with the pre-eminent photo brand

Thank you for your ongoing support of our brand and our businesses. We look forward to delivering the highest quality products and services to you, both today and into the future.

Twitter Chat with FILM photographers Aug 20

[F]network

UPDATE! THE CHAT TIME HAS BEEN MOVED TO 4PM EST, TUESDAY, AUG 20TH. 

We have some exciting news! Remember last March when we first featured the {F} Network here on 1000Words? Well, it’s almost time for the new season. To help everyone get ready, next Tuesday, August 20th at 5pm EST 4pm EST (NOTE UPDATED TIME!), we’re teaming up with the awesome photographers from FILM! Season 2 for a Twitter Chat. That’s right – the group behind [F} Network show’s popular educational and inspirational FILM! Season 2 will join us on  Twitter to talk about their experiences and give us a sneak peak of what we can expect in the new season. Wondering when Season 2 starts? They’ll tell us that, too.

Oh, and at the end of the chat… wait for it… there will be a Kodak film giveaway!

So next Tuesday at 5pm, fire up TweetDeck, TwitterChat or your Twitter app of choice, and follow the hashtag #KFchat to catch the conversation. Include #KFchat in your tweets so we can see what you have to share.

No doubt  we’ll all have lots to share after a day of picture taking on World Photography Day, the day before the chat!

Here are the photographers from FILM that will be participating so be sure to follow them on Twitter:

Tanja Lippert @tanjaLippert

Jonas Peterson @jonaspeterson

Ryan Muirhead @rnmphotography

Jan Scholz  @micmojo

And follow me @KodakCB for chat instructions, information, conversation starters and yes… the film giveaway and the schedule for FILM! Season 2.

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Tori Johnson: DIY Kid’s Magnetic Educational Photo Board

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As a mom of a rambunctious two-year-old I am constantly on the lookout for do-it-yourself ideas that are fun, affordable and educational. When I saw this idea on Pinterest I thought it was the perfect DIY to try out and I immediately had a cool idea on how to make it even better…use PICTURES instead of flashcards! Another bonus, you can do this entire DIY for approximately $30! Can’t beat that!

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Supplies:

  • Variety of Kodak photos
  • Oil Drip Pan (purchase at any auto supply store for approx. $10)
  • (1)  8x11in dry erase magnetic sheet
  • Variety of magnetic photo holders
  • Magnets
  • Scissors
  • Dry Erase Marker

 Screen Shot 2013-08-14 at 1.11.03 PM

 First, I decided what the “categories” were that I wanted to feature on the board. I knew that these would change as my son got older so I decided to go with a magnetic dry erase sheet so that I could easily make adjustments. I then just cut it in to strips to use at my category names.

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After I decided my categories I found some pictures on the Internet and ones that I had taken as well that fit in to my categories. I then dropped them on to a USB and took them to my local Kodak Kiosk which is right down the street at CVS. Within minutes I had all my pictures printed out. What is so great about using pictures is it is much easier for a toddler to understand what you are asking them is in the photo because they are true-to-life unlike cartoons that you see on flashcards. Additionally, you can make basically any category you want vs. being confined to what is available on a flashcard.

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Then you just slide the photos in to their magnetic holders so they are protected from little grubby toddler hands.

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That’s all it takes! Now ask your toddler all sorts of questions to drive their development! Some questions that I ask my son are, “Which photo is a cow?” “How does a pig go?” “Point to the color green.” Among many others! You can also use your extra magnets to hang photos of your family on the board as well!

 Screen Shot 2013-08-14 at 1.12.14 PM

 Tori Johnson writes about fashion, mommyhood and everything else in between on her blog The sTORIbook (www.thesTORIbook.com). You can also find her on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest!

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Shooting film by Matt Osborne

The Kodak 1000 word Film Friday blog is a dedicated platform where we feature great photographers sharing our passion for film photography.

Today we’re excited to feature a photographer from the UK, Matt Osborne. We discovered Matt following a fashion film shoot in Ukraine where he shot a model in black and white on Kodak Professional T-MAX 400 film. Here, in this blog post Matt talks about his passion for film photography and his use of Kodak film. Being a professional model and wedding photographer, Matt prefers to work with a mixture of film formats and cameras for different scenarios.

Take a look at Matt’s images and make up your own mind, then why not pick up a camera, buy some Kodak film and take some great shots yourself.

- Lars Fiedler

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Shooting film by Matt Osborne, Photographer, UK

I am a self taught model and wedding photographer and have been shooting for around four years. Towards the end of 2012 I was already shooting my digital Nikon D800 camera in full manual mode using some of the best legacy lenses ever produced but I needed more.  It was here that my journey with film began.  I started with a Contax 645 medium format film camera as I loved the wedding photography examples I had seen during my research shooting Kodak Professional Portra 400 film.  The skin tones are just unmatchable with digital.

Living in the UK, the light levels are often much lower especially in the winter months.  For this reason I often shoot Kodak Professional Portra 800 which allows me to photograph UK models and weddings with the same high quality and characteristic skin tones yet still with available light.  The Contax standard Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm f2 lens is a fast lens meaning it can be used in lower light situations. In this instance I can often use Kodak Professional Portra 400.  When I use my Mamiya RZ Pro II 6×7 however the lens are often f3.5 or f4.5 (200% less bright) so more light or faster film is required.  It is here than Kodak Professional Portra 800 saves me every time.   When large medium format film negatives are scanned I think it would be difficult to distinguish between Kodak Professional Portra 400 and Kodak Professional Portra 800.

Example - ARAX-CM and ARAX 80mm f2.8 lens, 120 Kodak Professional Portra 800 film, Agnieszka, Poland.

#1.Portra800,120,ARAX-CM,MatthewOsborne

My passion however is black and white film photography and I develop my own film using a mix of Kodak Professional Xtol and Agfa Rodinal.  I find I tend to see photos in black and white, pools of light and shadows.  I’m not sure if it is something I have developed or trained my eyes to see or just something I’m lucky to have.  Even with digital I tend to shoot B&W JPEGs.  For black and white film photography my favourite films are Kodak T-Max 100 and Kodak T-Max 400.  When shooting 35mm film I use a Nikon FM body then all my Nikon lenses I had invested in for digital.  As I like to use fast prime lens (85mm f1.4, 50mm f1.2, 200mm f2) I can shoot with available light more easily so I tend to use Kodak Professional T-Max 100.  This fast film gives ultrafine grain so when scanned the images look almost digital yet better as they have texture and a 3D quality.

Example – Nikon FM and Samyang 85mm f1.4 lens, 35mm Kodak Professional T-Max 100 film, Andra, UK

#2b. TMax100,35mm,NikonFM,SquCrop,MatthewOsborne

#2.TMax 100,35mm,NikonFM,MatthewOsborne

Film gives an apparent extra layer of detail that cannot be achieved with digital.  For the Contax 645 and the fast Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm f2 lens I also shoot Kodak Professional T-Max 100 however for my other medium format cameras I need faster film.

My most used film camera is a medium format re branded Russian Kiev 88 6×6 camera badged as an ARAX-CM.  The camera is also known as a Hasselbladski as is a Soviet copy of the famous Hasselblad.  I love the 6×6 format and the camera is compact so is my first choice when I need to fit a medium format film camera into my hand luggage.  I love the no frills shooting. No battery, no light meter, just a box, a lens and some film.  This lets me channel all my energy into each photo resulting in often better composed and more thought through images.  The ARAX lenses tend to be f2.8 or f3.5 but for super sharp images stopping the lenses down to f5.6 can give the most striking and high quality results.  Stopping down the lenses means I need more light or faster film.  Living in the UK the first is not an option in the winter months so I shoot Kodak T-Max 400 film.  As with the Kodak Professional Portra 800, when T-Max 400 is scanned it would be difficult to tell it from Kodak T-Max 100.  Both offer exceptional B&W tonal ranges and super film grain.

Example - ARAX-CM and Mir 38v lens, 120 Kodak Professional T-Max 400 film,  Yulya, Ukraine.

MatthewOsborne-PhotoOfMeExample - ARAX-CM and Mir 38v lens, 120 Kodak Professional T-Max 400 film,  Yulya, Ukraine.#3.TMax400,ARAX-CM, Yulya

I feel my journey with film is just beginning and I hope to enjoy many more years with Kodak.  I already offer film photography for weddings but hope to attract a niche market in the future for those who like to enjoy the finer things in life.

To find out more about Matt Osborne please visit:

http://www.matthewosbornephotography.co.uk/

or follow his blog and Flickr pages at

http://matthewosbornephotography.wordpress.com/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/32681588@N03/

Curation and Expression in the Connected World

Last week, Amazon rolled out a new service, called “Amazon Collections,” which lets consumers create a visual display of products they like, pulled from Amazon’s catalog of goods. Or as David Seifert wrote last week in The Verge, “Amazon Collections copies Pinterest’s layout to display your wish list.”

Pinterest, launched in early 2010, had more than 70 million users worldwide at the end of July 2013*, and has the potential to reshape the way in which commerce happens, as evidence by Amazon’s new service. In his article in Fast Company “Can Ben Silbermann Turn Pinterest Into The World’s Greatest Shopfront?” Max Chafkin writes “To create a pinboard is to say to the world, Here are the beautiful things that make me who I am–or who I want to be.”

So how do these two services relate to our professional lab customers? On Pinterest and through Amazon Collections, disparate individual products are curated to create a social visual representation (and purchases) that some argue is greater than its individual parts. We began thinking about this consumer behavior years ago and this past June, introduced KODAK PROFESSIONAL Collections and Creations software, to allow our professional lab customers to engage in this curation and present professional photographic output that mirrors this social, visual expression.

KPRO_C&CS_H

Collections represent the manifestation of what in the past we’ve described as our Prints, Pages and Screens strategy into a tangible product and an actionable plan for the professional market.  We defined a Collection as a thematic compilation of photo products, such as DVDs, enhanced stills, prints, albums/books, photo gifts, and more to commemorate life’s treasured moments.  This expert curation enables consumers to:

  • Promote their memories and stories by sharing with family and friends anytime, anywhere. (digital output)
  • Produce their memories in story form. (photo books, albums and keepsakes)
  • Preserve their milestone memories for a lifetime. (heirloom prints)

The concept of Promote, Produce, and Preserve helps define the meaning of photographic-oriented Collections.  And the order of these three benefits is crucial to successful sales: Promote memories first, then fast follow to produce them in story form, and complete the collection by preserving them in heirloom products.

Photographers are encouraged to lead with socialization products; digital products that meet consumers’ primary need to showcase their important life moments in their socially connected world. Consumers’ today expect to use their professional images in the same manner they do their own images – to share them anytime, anywhere.  Once the photographer has achieved this objective, they can then move on to produce the memories in story form in albums, books, keepsakes, and more and complete the collection by preserving the memories for a lifetime in heirloom prints.

KODAK PROFESSIONAL Collections and Creations presents professional output, not as individual disparate products, but as a curated, visual representation of important life moments that enable consumers to share, tell, and preserve their milestone events.

*Semiocast, July 2013, “Pinterest has 70 million users
More than 70% are in the U.S.”