Guest blogger: Tiana Stephens – Making connections from Korean War photos

A single photograph of a person—just one moment in someone’s lifetime—has a way of revealing things that are sometimes too complex for words. It conveys emotion, perspective, context, and evokes vivid memories, especially for the ones left behind when that person passes away.

He didn’t talk too much but he always greeted me with a drawn out “hell-o grand-daughter” through his mustache and long white beard. His voice was full and wise and came from the bottom of his pot belly with a slight southern twang. The most I knew of my grandfather, Crawford Flynn, was that he was good with his hands–thumb included–when it came to gardening, and that I had the special honor of sitting proudly beside him at the head of the table when I was too small to climb up there myself. I liked watching him make things in his workshop–wooden toys, instruments and eventually an entire miniature city, “Tiny Town,” for my grandma’s daycare. My brother and I would find scrap pieces of wood and swirl the layers of sawdust on the floor into designs while he worked. For many winters Tiny Town transformed into the North Pole and he was Santa to us grandkids and Smile Day Care kids at Christmas. We were all in awe of his talents. In the warmer season I was always amazed at his canopies of string beans, giant twisted cucumbers, dahlias and fluffy peonies bigger than my face. It was decades ago but the memories come back as colorful as his garden.

Two years ago on Independence Day I was watching a story on 13 WHAM news about a local woman who had inherited a very special collection of photos released by the Department of Defense that were taken during the Korean War. The reporter, Adam Chodak explained that Betty Perkins-Carpenter, a vet herself (among many other impressive accomplishments in her 83 years including an Olympic diving coach) was trying to connect veterans or families with the faces in the photos she calls her “gems.” The story flashed through some of the photos up close, and the camera moved over more and more stacks spread across a table.

These were not the type of wartime pictures that you see in history books, in the news on Veterans Day or when certain anniversaries come around. They were pictures of soldiers doing very ordinary things under not-so-ordinary circumstances, like posing with a dog or drinking pop. The story showed Betty on the phone calling small-town newspapers and people she found in the phone book whose names matched the names in the detailed captions printed on the back of the photos. She didn’t have any luck making connections during that story.

Screen Shot 2014-07-26 at 10.55.06 AM

In the two-minute news story I thought I saw something familiar. Maybe it was wishful thinking but in one of the photos there was a group of about a dozen soldiers and one man in the center of the of the group looked like my grandfather. I checked the list of names that was posted online with the story. No Crawford Flynn. I watched again a few days later on my computer, trying to pause the video just right on what I thought I saw. I told myself there was no way that out of the hundreds of faces that it could be so. No way. I’m from Colorado and my grandfather was originally from North Carolina, so how could a picture of him surface in New York? I dismissed the idea partly because of the low probability that it was him and partly out of fear of disappointment that it was not.

A little more than a year later I was going through a large brown accordion file that I keep old family photos in. The oldest photos are tucked safely in envelopes inside of folders and separated by family (Wong for my mother, Flynn for my father). I came across some pictures that my dad had given me when my grandfather passed away in 2005. Two small and tattered pictures were of him when he served in the Air Force during the Korean War. I immediately thought again of Betty’s story and her picture collection. I could still see the image in my head and decided to make arrangements to see the photo in person. I was nervous that I would be let down if it was not him in the photo but I knew I would regret it if I never saw it for myself.

I came to her house alone on a mild night in October, ringing the bell from outside the porch then reluctantly stepping inside the porch to knock on the door of the house. She answered with the same enthusiasm I saw on the TV story, greeting me with a hug and then leading me through the quiet house, explaining some of the various artifacts from around the world and how she came into possession of them before we reached her office. She had so many wonderful stories to tell that I soon worried I would disappoint her if I was not related to the man in the picture.

IMG_8667

We walked over to a bureau in her office and Betty picked up a manila envelope with the words “Our Gems” written with a marker on the front. She laid the photograph down carefully in front of me and I put my hands up to my mouth and gasped. I immediately knew that it was him! His posture, profile, hair—everything about him was so recognizable. We jumped up and down and cried with joy “it’s him, it’s him, oh my gosh, look at that!” I put my small photos next to the 8×10 for comparison. The images almost mirrored each other. It was an incredible discovery—Betty always says “she was all goose bumps” when we talk about it today and we still can’t believe our own story when we tell it.

On my next visit back to Denver, I brought this gem to my grandmother, father, aunts, uncles, siblings and cousins. The image brought out so many incredible stories that I had never heard before. Wonderful stories about how my grandmother met my grandfather when he was stationed in Japan following the war. Nobuko Ikeda was a stunning, petite young lady working in a coffee shop on the Air Force base. She naturally attracted many admirers who would learn after waiting in a long line for coffee that she didn’t want anything to do with courters—let alone American ones. She was hard-working and humble, from a well respected Japanese family and she said she never wanted people to think of her as “a girl who goes with GI’s.” Yet, somehow my grandfather was able to convince her to marry him and then she did eventually “go with him”…all the way back to the United States.

I keep these family stories in my heart. But it’s the photographs—the illustrations from the years so far before my own—that I can hold and see, that will be my most treasured possessions until it’s time to pass them down to my own grandchildren.

When my grandfather died, I regretted not being brave enough to ask him about his experiences both in Korea and Vietnam. Was he scared? Did war change him and somehow was it worth it if it led him to meet my grandma? Now, having this extraordinary photo of him—obtained through extraordinary means—I found something that I didn’t know was lost.

The night I took the photo home, I knew the next thing I needed to do was to help Betty find more families that might be able to make the same incredible connection that I did. I knew that the picture collection needed to be available where the world could see it, that they should be scanned and posted online.

Betty and I talked about what we could do to make this happen, and I was able to eventually connect with Chuck Rudd at Kodak Alaris and a wonderful team of experts who were just as excited as Betty and I about the project. Kodak Alaris found a way to safely scan the pristine collection of glossy black and white 8×10 photos—nearly 200 of them—front and back!

IMG_8671

In Rochester New York–where everyone knows everyone–word travels fast and good stories travel faster. I’m happy to report that the Democrat and Chronicle heard about the project and is hosting an online gallery of Betty’s entire collection of photos, complete with the captions on the back complete with dates and locations and even names and hometowns on some.

IMG_8665

Words can’t describe how thankful I am to have connected with Betty and this photo, Kodak Alaris and the Democrat and Chronicle. I hope that through this project many more families, widows or veterans themselves of the “Forgotten War” will be able to make a connection with a photo and perhaps remember stories that will be passed along to future generations. After all, our story begins with the stories of those who came before us. And a picture is worth so much more than 1,000 words.

Chatting with Melissa Love for #KodakMoment

Melissa Love Photo

Selfie of Melissa Love

Mother, graphic designer and photographer, Melissa Love was the very first person we featured in our #KodakMoment series in the UK, where we ask people to tell a story in three photographs. Melissa moved from Brighton to the beautiful fishing village of Fowey in Cornwall two years ago and finds that photography provides her with the perfect opportunity to be creative and relax. We caught up with her to ask her what makes her tick…

You can see Melissa’s three #KodakMoment photos below:

Probably the most photos I take are of my kids when they don’t know I’m there. I tuck myself out of the way. They don’t pose – they’re bored of me!

Q: What drives you to take photographs?
A: Once you start seeing something you get into the habit of good composition, and with my graphic design background you see everything with a good frame. I find it very relaxing.

Q: What cameras do you use? Film vs digital?
A: I use both film and digital. I have a digital SLR Canon 5D MK2, and sometimes my smartphone is easily enough for my needs – I have a lot of camera apps on my phone. I’m a big Instagrammer. I like the discipline of using film too, and I also have an old Polaroid camera.

More Sprinkles Photo

Melissa’s daughter Grace having fun with the sprinkles during a baking session

Q: What inspires you to get out there and shoot?
A: What doesn’t! I usually get inspired when I’m out somewhere with my kids, taking them to the beach. I also do a lot of street photography – any situation can inspire me. It can be mundane, or it could be a shot of dream weather. I have to consciously not take the camera with me sometimes.

Q: What are your favourite subjects to photograph?
A: Probably the most photos I take are of my kids when they don’t know I’m there. I tuck myself out of the way. They don’t pose – they’re bored of me! They’re used to it, as I’m not up in their faces. Grace is a complete show-off, and Lily doesn’t want to be left out.

Q: Which photographers do you admire and why?
A: Alain Laboile. He takes pictures of his kids – he lives on a muddy farm and his photos are stunning and very different. He has really inspired my work. My favourite photo of all time would be one of his.

Larking about in the rain photo

Grace larking about outdoors during stormy weather

Q: Do you like having your photo taken?
A: I’m trying not to mind it. There’s only one photo of me together with my children, and my new year’s resolution is to ask a photographer to take a photo of all of us together. I love looking back at old photos of my Mum and I want my children to know how I looked at various points in my life, too. You can’t wait forever – you just need to get on with it.

Q: What is your guilty pleasure?
A: I eat lunch at my desk – as I don’t have that much time due to working within school hours, I will be eating a bowl of noodles while working, while being on the phone to a client – sometimes they can hear me slurping.

Q: What would be the first thing you’d rescue in a house fire?
A: After my children, my Mac!

Q: Tell us a secret about yourself.
A: I can make balloon animals, including a sausage dog, a cat and a bird on a swing!

Smelly Business Photo

Grace signalling to a family friend that changing nappies is a smelly business

To see more of Melissa Love’s photos visit: Website www.melissalove.co.uk Twitter @melissarachlove; Instagram @melissalove

Want to get involved with #KodakMoment? If you can tell a great story in three photos, get in touch with us on the UK Facebook page

Film Friday: Talking with Jonathan Canlas

Cruise through Jonathan Canlas’ instagram account, and its clear – his two greatest passions are his adorable family and film photography. Canlas, isn’t just an extremely talented photographer, but he’s also the founder of Film Is Not Dead. He calls Hawaii home but travels the globe conducting his wildly popular FIND Workshops. He’ll head to the UK in February and team with the UK Film Lab to put on one of his two-day workshops. These workshops, in Canlas’ words, are part of a “community, family, a belief, a journey, centered around FIND-ing your unique voice through film photography.” If you’re lucky enough to be in Brighton this February, get your spot http://filmisnotdead.com/#workshopsektar100     We asked Jonathan to share some of the top 5 questions he receives in each workshop. Perhaps some of you have had these questions.

KodakPortra400We’re also lucky enough to have some of Jonathan’s work as well. For more of his work, visit ALOHA.KodakPortra160VC

1. Will shooting film make me a better photographer?

The answer to this is yes and no.

I mean, putting film in your hands is not going to make you see the world differently or make you magically better at your craft.  Meaning if you don’t see light, understand composition, or have a strong voice, film is not going to just give that skill to you.  HOWEVER, when film is put in your hands it forces you to slow down and shoot very differently than if you were shooting digitally.  With a digital camera that has cards that have the capacity to hold thousands upon thousands of images it is easy to just click away, taking multiple captures of one thing.  With no real limitation with digital in how many photos you can take, the discipline to take one and move on is just not needed.  It is really easy to get loose about what you are shooting with that mentality.  However, on film, every time you click it costs money and a certain discipline is usually adapted when shooting film.  With more intention combined with a slower pace, it will literally make you analyze everything that is going in your frame. And this I think can make you a better photographer in the long run.  Where the opposite can make you a sloppy photographer.  It makes you a lot more intentional that is for sure.

Another way it will make you a better photographer is it will force you to learn your exposures.  Obviously, there is no chimping with film.  And to get the perfect negative that requires no time behind a computer requires the perfect exposure.  And if you stick with one ISO for even one full day, you’ll really get to learn really quickly the exposures in different lighting situations.

E100VScrossprocessed

2. What limitations does film have?

Some, but not many.  I still think digital is king in low light situations in terms of shooting in color.  Even if I can underexpose KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA 400 up to 3 stops, it has to be the right light and that light is not always available nor is your subject going to always just be hanging out in that light.  But on the b/w side of things, KODAK PROFESSIONAL TRI-X is incredible.  I’ve seen it pushed to 6400 iso and shot in the darkest of dank receptions and have amazing amazing results.  Other than the low light limitation in terms of color, its abilities outweigh the limitations.  The dynamic range is incredible along with color and most importantly, how images look straight out of camera when scanned by a good lab like the lab I use theFINDlab (http://thefindlab.com).

KodakPortra400VC

3. How can I shoot film and not have it break the bank as digital costs me nothing?

I think the myth needs to be busted that shooting digitally does not “cost” you anything.  First, there is the initial cost of your DSLR, which as time has shown, is usually upgraded every year and some change.  Combine that with the depreciation of your “old” DSLR and you’ve got quite some costs accumulating.  Then there is the “cost” of the time of editing your images.  I don’t know many (any for that matter) that deliver clients images straight out of their camera.  Some time is needed to edit those images and as they say, time is money.  I honestly think that shooting film and shooting digitally the costs are the same.  Either I can shoot film and not have to sit behind a computer or I can “save money” and shoot digitally and then be stuck behind a computer.  Also, touching on the answer of question number 1, when you shoot film, you are not burning through thousands of exposures.  Less editing time and more keepers equals a lot of “money” saved.  Remember, time is money, no matter how you try to rationalize it.

KodakPortra400VC2

4. What is the best film stock to use in multiple lighting situations?

I have found KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA 400 to be the best film for this.  I can effectively have an ISO of 50-3200, without having to change how I develop the roll.  That means I can overexpose up to 3 stops (I’ve even done up to 4 before) and under-expose up to 3 stops all on the same roll without having to pull/push the roll.  The Vision 3 technology in the new PORTRA 400 is absolutely incredible.  Now mind you, you can’t just underexpose PORTRA 400 by 3 stops and think it will look amazing.  You have to find the right light to be able to do this.  Meaning, when you shoot underexposed like this, you need to make sure that whatever you are shooting is lit or has some kind of luminosity to it.  You can’t shoot into a cave with no light and expect it to look ok.  However, if you have some dimly LIT subjects, try underexposing PORTRA 400 and be amazed by the results.

KodakPortra400VC3

5. I know you say FILM IS NOT DEAD but is it close?

No, not at all.  A good friend of mine, Mark Sperry, said something in regards to this recently.  Basically it has never been better for film shooters than it is today.  Even with all of our limitations.  We are missing a TON of different film stocks, camera makers, and labs that used to be around say 10-15 years ago are long gone.  But the ones we do have right now are the best of the best.  We have only a handful of film stocks to choose from but the abilities of said film (the new Kodak Portra line) stocks are amazing.  We only have a couple companies still making film cameras, but we have a HUGE surplus of cameras that people are no longer using and can be snatched up for pennies on the dollar.  And the labs that are open and thriving today (theFINDlab) are labs that are mostly run by film shooters and know how to scan color neg film.  It is a great time to be a film shooter that is for sure.  Arguably the best time.

Kodak Alaris, Kodak Professional and PhotoPlus Expo 2013

Tomorrow kicks off the annual PhotoPlus Expo and Conference in New York. While our team works on getting the booth up and running, I wanted to tell you a little bit about what you’ll see from Kodak Alaris in the coming days.

First, you’ll see our new name – Kodak Alaris. We’re excited to show how our new company preserves the heritage and legacy of the KODAK brand, while quickly addressing needs and changes of the professional market.

Sarah Vaughan PPE 2013 Tanja Lippert PPE 2013

As always, we’ll have our full portfolio of KODAK PROFESSIONAL Media and KODAK PROFESSIONAL Film on hand. You’ll see those products brought to life by through the photography of Jeff Yeats, Tanja Lippert, Sarah Vaughan and Martin Grahame-Dunn in our booth, printed on our KODAK PROFESSIONAL ENDURA Premier Paper.

MGD PPE 2013 Jeff Yeats PPE 2013

In addition to showcasing his photography in our booth, Grahame-Dunn will also present two sessions at PhotoPlus, entitled  “Collections: Elevate your expertise; Control your future!” on Thursday 11:15-12:00 and Friday 2:15-3:00 in the PhotoPlus Show Floor Theater.

Grahame-Dunn’s presentation illustrates the value of our new solution for photographers and professional labs, called KODAK PROFESSIONAL Collections and Creations Software. The solution is designed to help both professional labs and photographers deliver products in a way that more directly aligns with how consumers purchase today. Consumers crave immediacy. Let’s meet that craving.

How do we meet that craving? We provide them the soft-copy. That’s right. A company that creates some of the highest quality media available for photographic printing says “give consumers the digital file.” As an industry, we need to meet today’s consumers on their terms.

But note, we don’t say “give them the soft-copy for free,” which is where the nuance lies. We believe that any photographer who simply gives away the digital content leaves money on the table. At the same time, we believe any photographer who doesn’t offer digital content missed opportunities as well. Our message is to offer today’s consumer a Collection of photo products that include soft-copy offerings in conjunction with prints, albums, books, keepsakes and more to commemorate life’s treasured moments. Once you’ve provided the option for the soft copy and have captured the consumers’ interest, you then show them just how much more they can do with the professional content to preserve their memories for a lifetime.

With the Collections and Creations Software, products are organized into thoughtfully created sets that follow a logical flow to help photographers guide their clients through the story-telling process, from start to finish.  Photographers will be able to show how they take the professional content and deliver an experience that creates an emotional connection among the consumers, their images and their story.

This in turn, enables the consumers to:

•Promote their memories by sharing with family and friends anytime, anywhere

•Produce their memories in story form

•Preserve their memories for a lifetime

The goal of the solution is enabling photographers to function as consultants, artists and trusted advisors for their clients, rather than providers of a commodity. Because we believe that’s what photographers, in conjunction with their lab partners, are. They are consultants who have made the investment, in the form of equipment, time and energy to develop a craft that includes a vision and a skill to make beautiful photographs that tell a story that preserves memories for a lifetime.

We hope you’ll come by the booth in New York to learn more. We’ll be at booth #855 in Javits Conventions Center Thursday – Saturday.

Rebecca Szuniewicz: Calling all Photographers of any level!

Every year, in August, the Pittsford Carriage Association takes Walnut Hill Farm back to the late 19th century to host the Walnut Hill Carriage Driving Competition.  For five days in August the farm transforms, to a time where the horse and carriage was the main source of transportation, and also represented social status.

100_1971

I have attended this event the last couple of years.  It is a wonderful opportunity to get some beautiful and unique photographs.  The farm is decorated beautifully with thousands of flowers, which in itself is great for photographs. The carriages are restored pieces of art from early Americana, and are a must see! The outfits are truly remarkable and add to the authenticity of this event.

100_1962

And, of course saving the best for last, the horses!  They alone command attention and respect the minute they enter the ring.  They will definitely give you reasons to keep your shutter clicking away.  Once you start taking pictures of these majestic creatures, you won’t stop. Put the whole package together-flowers, carriage, outfit and horses, and you have yourself a brilliant afternoon full of tons of photo opportunities. And besides your photographs you will truly enjoy the afternoon at this unique international competition.

100_1980

The event takes place Aug 14th-18th at 397 West Bloomfield Rd in Pittsford, NY.  Walnut Hill is handicapped accessible (call ahead for a staffed golf cart to meet your car), provides ample free parking, and dog friendly.  For full details and schedule of events please visit www.walnuthillfarm.org

- Rebecca Szuniewicz

Films Not Dead winner – Guillaume Périmony

Recently, when Film’s Not Dead (F.N.D.)ran its  Kodak Moments competition, hundreds of photographers submitted pretty amazing images shot on Kodak film. F.N.D., founded by Charlie Abiss, Tori Khambhaita and Jamie Rothwell, brings together like-minded photographers who enjoy the benefits that film photography offers and to provide information on film availability within the UK, while sharing imaginative, thought provoking images.  Together, the group, after reviewing all the submissions, named French photographer Guillaume Périmony, as the winner. We’re thrilled to feature Périmony, 28,  who tells us why he shoots film and allows us to share some of his favourite black and white pictures shot on KODAK PROFESSIONAL Tri-X film. Thank you to F.N.D. for its commitment to the film community and congratulations to Périmony on his award winning submission. – Lars

************************************************************************************

8579698769_3a2729fa8b_o

I’ve been shooting film since I took up photography in 2002, so have been using it for more than ten years. The process of using film requires much more patience,  desire and passion, however the result of shooting film gives me a unique feeling of satisfaction and professionalism about my photography skills.

8574422391_3e0353ee22_o

I shoot using an Olympus OM1 camera and most often load Kodak Tri-X, not only is it the most cost efficent black and white film to use, I also find it the easiest to shoot.  Tri-X brings a classic look and feel to my images and you can still have a good shot even if you miss your exposure.

9005236489_c5e659eb94_o

More importantly for me as an amateur film photographer is that I find that shooting film enables my cameras to have a longer usage span.  I don’t have to worry about my camera not being the latest technology, or it not supporting specific software etc. That coupled with the added benefit of knowing that my printed images will last a lot longer than digital images and aren’t going to be stored away on a drive that may become corrupt or ‘out of date’means a lot to photographers like me. Shooting film and printing images means that I can simply enjoy the camera I want, the way I want, with the film I want – which I am much more confident about and the end result is something slid and touchable!”

- Guillaume Périmony

4172192034_72b5a7bc31_o

As a keen skateboarder, Périmony spends a lot of his time on the street and this is often where he shoots, both still and action shots of the ‘life in a skate park’ etc.  When not on four small wheels, Périmony likes to shoot images of interesting people.   You can see more of Périmony’s work on his Flickr gallery http://www.flickr.com/photos/guiom/.

You can also find out more about Périmony and his winning image ‘Burmese Days’ on the Films Not Dead blog.

ESSENCE Festival™ Photo Booth Powered by Kodak

EF2013_Official 4COLOR

The ESSENCE Festival™ kicks off starting on the Fourth of July running unti Sunday, July 7 in New Orleans. Kodak will be adding to the fun at the Festival by powering a photo book where guests can get a photo on an ESSENCE cover or with other cool backgrounds.

Kodak_Family Day_4x6

Look for the ESSENCE Festival™ Photo Booth Powered by Kodak  in the Fan Zone and other high-traffic locations in the Convention Center as well as Woldenberg Park during Family Reunion Day and the Superdome for each night of concerts. Photos are $20 each.

KODAK_Essence cover2_6x8

Wedding season and Kodak Picture Kiosk

DSC_0705

It’s wedding season and I was fortunate to attend two so far. The first one was my little sister’s. Of course I show up with my camera. Now both of the weddings had a professional photographer. You don’t want to leave the pictures of an event like this to your sister who might get distracted by the cake *ahem* and miss the big shot. Always invest in a pro photographer who will make sure every moment is captured beautifully for you to remember for years to come.

DSC_0707

I like to take pictures myself so I have something to post to Facebook and make prints for the fridge right away.

DSC_0852

This past weekend I went to the lake-side nuptuals of my friends Taylor and Andrew. What a great backdrop for photos of the bride and groom!

DSC_0864

I especially like taking photos of the wedding details… flowers, table settings, cake, dresses… even the bride’s nails and shoes! I think it’s because I know how much work goes into making those elements of the big day special.

DSC_0856

Again with the flowers. I like to get close ups of these beauties.

DSC_0866

Sometimes I can’t wait to get home and look at the pictures I captured of the happy couple! I pick the best for Facebook and then I start printing! Kodak Picture Kiosk has lots of choices for creative ways to use those wedding photos.

collage

I made a collage of pictures I took at my sister’s bridal shower. You can choose to let the Kiosk auto fill all the spots or fill them yourself. Either way you can still move them around and edit each picture until it is just right. I love these for framing or hanging on the fridge or at the office. It looks much tidier than nine separate photos.

border

Our grandmother couldn’t make the wedding so I made prints in order for to see all the activity. You have the option to add a border to your prints which make them frame-ready or just add a little extra something to where ever you might display them. There are plenty of borders to choose from so it can compliment the photo.

photo-book

Naturally photo books are great for remembering a wedding. My sister is moving overseas and has a lot to pack so I made her a wee little photo book that won’t take up much room.

calendar

Here is something you can make the newlyweds that they will really love. Use photos of their wedding to make a calendar. I made this one page calendar which is nice for pinning to a corkboard message center. A twelve page monthly calendar would be really nice too. Fun for the couple to look at throughout their first year of marriage!

canvas

This is one of the coolest things I think you can make at a Kodak Picture Kiosk… a canvas print! These turn out super cute and ready to hang, no need for a frame. It has a painterly aspect to it. I can’t wait to give this one to the newlyweds!

To make any of these photo gifts check here to find a Kiosk near you that makes that particular product.

I have also pinned lots of great wedding photo projects on Pinterest that you can repin too!

Cole Barash, Iceland and Kodak Film

On the very first portrait Cole Barash went to shoot for his feature on Iceland, “64.133 ºN/21.9333 ºW” in this month’s Relapse Magazine, one of his lights blew up.  Blew. Up.

“Yeah, it’s not like you’re able to run to Adorama and pick up a new light,” said Barash. “So I just stripped my kit to basically a one-light set up with a fill option. It pushed me a little bit to use just that and not have so many options. OK.”

16352_CBA_ICELAND_29_04-Edit

At 25, Barash has photographed campaigns for Adidas, Nike, Rag and Bone, Brixton and Burton. A die-hard film user, Barash’s laid-back persona belies the strength of his creative vision, his disciplined approach to photography and respect for the medium and its history. That drew Relapse Editor Ian Frisch to his work.

“The concept of film in relationship to his photography even furthers my view of him as a true photographer,” said Frisch. “Rather than picking up the newest and flashiest equipment, Cole utilizes the history and foundations of photography, in a physical sense, to capture moments in a way that people have been doing for decades that, in some instances, the younger generation has lost touch with. His passion for photography, across the board, is something that is very rare now-a-days, and something that I hold in the highest respect.”

16352_CBA_ICELAND_21_07

Barash headed to Iceland with 100 rolls of film to shoot a personal project. When Frisch heard about Barash’s trip, he asked him to do a shoot for Relapse featuring the increasingly influential arts and fashion scene in Iceland. Relapse, founded in 2012, showcases edgy, progressive fashion photography and provocative culture journalism.

With not a lot of time or pre-planning, Barash moved quickly to find and create compelling portraits of designers and artists who make up this community and culture.  That same creative vision and work ethic he uses in the back bowls of Canada worked in the studios of Reykjavík.

“Shooting snowboarding out in the back country has taught me a lot. You can’t exactly run 200 feet through waist deep snow to go check an angle,” said Barash. “You really start to put yourself in that 200 foot position and how it’s going to frame up and what it’s going to look at. You need to go find the best angle quick.”

16352_CBA_ICELAND_99_03

In Iceland, when shooting designers, “as soon as I got into their studio, I made some quick decisions on how their brand and how they as a person would be interpreted to me – light and flashy, dark and moody, vibrant and atrocious.”

For the bands, Barash wanted to create photographs that conveyed the feeling of Iceland, as well as the band members themselves.

16352_CBA_ICELAND_77_06

In all cases, Barash moved fast – deciding how he wanted to shoot, the tools he would use to shoot and the need to focus his energy on making a connection with the subjects.

“I knew the tools I had and what I could do with them. I kind of quickly made decisions about the environment – where I wanted to shoot them and how I wanted to light it. Then I just started shooting.”

16352_CBA_ICELAND_106_04

Barash shot mostly with KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA 160, with a bit of  KODAK PROFESSIONAL TRI-X thrown in.

“I love the tones on PORTRA, especially on the skin – I haven’t found anything better,” said Barash. “It’s very soft and fairly muted, but not so muted it feels desaturated; very good contrast.”

“TRI-X – generally the contrast and the grain is pretty spot on for what I like to shoot. Especially when you start developing different filters and process,” said Barash. “I think I’ve been shooting it for so long that I know how something’s going to look on a negative.”

The latest issue of Relapse Magazine is available now in New York at Barnes and Noble Union Square, Soho International News, McNally Jackson Bookstore, Lafayette Smokeshop, Bouwerie Iconic, and Bedford Exotics in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. It is also available through the iTunes Store on all participating mobile devices.

For more on Cole Barash, visit

ColeBarash.com

Nomadda.tumblr.com

Instagram: @nomadda.

And for more on Relapse Magazine, visit

http://relapsemag.com.

Instagram: @relapsemagazine

Film’s Not Dead Store and Film Photography Gallery

FND

Back in 2010, three friends and lovers of film photography, Charlie Abiss, Tori Khambhaita and Jamie Rothwell got together and formed the Film’s not Dead (FND) group. They intended to bring together like-minded photographers who enjoy the benefits that film photography offers and to provide information on film availability within the UK, while sharing imaginative, thought provoking images.

Today FND has nearly 5000 followers on Facebook and has a regular stall in London’s famous Brick Lane market. Due to that success, FND has yesterday opened a permanent store and film photography gallery in the West End of London.

Fans and followers of the Film’s not Dead page enjoy discussions, take part in exciting competitions – such as ones from Kodak ourselves, and locate nearby venues where people can buy film or have film developed.

Now with the opening of a new store and gallery, FND will offer film photographers and fans so much more. Each month, on the upper floor, the gallery will host a collection of images shot on film by professional and amateur photographers. To launch the new space, Film’s not Dead is proud to open its new store and gallery with a collection from one of its own, Tori Khambhaita, with her unique “Printers” exhibition, which was shot using Kodak’s Tri-X film.

Tori’s ‘Printers’ project gained national press and won her the coveted title of Young Black and White photographer of the year 2012.  This isn’t only a photographic show; it’s an awe-inspiring exhibition of skills and the unseen faces that have powered London’s photographic printing industry for decades.

Dennis Watson - ® Tori Khambhaita

Dennis Watson – ® Tori Khambhaita

Tori has created something truly original, which bridges the gap between the prints and the printers. The prints are truly one off’s, as each printer in the shots has illustrated their creativity and style, which can never be duplicated. This exhibition not only shows you the faces behind the London print industry, it also shows the skills behind those faces.

Klaus Kalde - ® Tori Khambhaita

Klaus Kalde – ® Tori Khambhaita

Tori, who works with some of the featured printers, gained exclusive access to the darkrooms of her subjects. After photographing either inside or outside of the darkroom, she herself would return to Klaus Kalde’s, where she would develop her own rolls of film.

Lee Williams - Raipd Eye - ® Tori Khambhaita

Lee Williams – Raipd Eye – ® Tori Khambhaita

Upon developing the negatives, Tori returned to the printers themselves and asked them to reflect their personal styles and preferences in the final image, again making each photograph unique.  Some have chosen to stay safe whilst others have gone all out, which will leave the viewer wide eyed and open mouthed asking ‘how?’.

Nick Jones - Photofusion - ® Tori Khambhaita

Nick Jones – Photofusion – ® Tori Khambhaita

Aside from the prints Tori also asked these highly skilled craftsmen to state the story that preceded them. These handwritten anecdotes beautifully entwine to create an absolutely fabulous narrative of life within London’s photographic printing industry.

Robin Bell - ® Tori Khambhaita

Robin Bell – ® Tori Khambhaita

This show is a testament to all that support traditional photography and recognise the years of acquired skill it takes to call yourself a darkroom printer. Tori’s exhibition and images celebrates the master craftsmanship and style of these artists committed to traditional photographic printing. The knowledge of the featured men and women in the photographs have acquired on their journey is invaluable! Tori’s ‘Printers’ exhibition will run from 3rd May 2013 – 28th May 2013 at the new Film’s not Dead gallery and store.

Film’s not Dead
13 Mount Pleasant
London
WC1X 0AR

Opening Times: Mon – Fri: 11.00 – 6.00