Guest Post for Film Friday: Photographer Tanja Lippert

My name is Tanja Lippert and I am a 100% film photographer specializing in weddings, fashion, commercial, music & fine art photography. I’m also one of the hosts of a very special show on the Framed Network called FILM!

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I live in sunny California, but travel worldwide for photography assignments. I am very passionate and committed to my craft. I love adventure, creativity, traveling, spontaneity, teaching and inspiring others. I am a dreamer and a hopeless romantic at heart. I thank God that he has blessed me with creative gifts and abundant love. On top of all that, I am pretty much a big dork!! I often get asked, “Why do you still shoot with film?” The answer is pretty simple. I am a huge fan of the quality, richness & “magical” look that film has to offer. My favorite films to shoot include Kodak BWCN 400, PORTRA 160 and PORTRA 800.  I love the creaminess of the BWCN 400 and the fact that it is process C41 makes it easy for labs to scan this film and it is really beautiful!  The PORTRA 160 is my favorite portrait film to shoot, the skin tones are beautiful and it has a creaminess to it that I love.  The PORTRA 800 is wonderful film to shoot in both low light and sunlight, it has a beautiful saturation to it, while still keeping skin tones looking natural and amazing!  Shooting film “connects” me to my subject and surroundings and makes me more acute to what is happening in front of my camera. There is no reason for me to be distracted by viewing the images in the back of my camera all day, so instead, I am focused on looking through the viewfinder; waiting for just the right moments to capture.

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So many of those moments came during the filming of this season’s FILM Show. We spent eight days in the desert of Las Vegas shooting everything from muscle guys and muscle cars to beautiful models and beautiful scenery to a real wedding to getting shoot whatever makes our hearts happy.  I chose to shoot one of the Assistant Producers in a series of “beauty” pictures because one of my favorite things to shoot are women.  I love to make them feel special and beautiful in their own skin.

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When I started shooting fashion work back in 2001, digital was not even an option. I learned photography on film and have NEVER switched. Despite the pressure of the photographic industries and all my fellow photographers, I have held steadfast and true to my love of film and have NO plans on ever switching. By using one of the best film labs in the world to scan my film into high-resolution digital files- I get the best of both worlds, film & digital. I get the look and beauty of FILM CAPTURE along with the convenience of digital (like utilizing Photo Shop when needed and being able to show my work on the internet and share digital files with my clients). Yes, it is true that film is more expensive to shoot and requires me to be an EXPERT at my craft. That is exactly why I will continue to shoot with it. For me, photography is still an art. It’s MY art. It’s my blood, my sweat and my tears. It’s also my joy and my love. I would NEVER dream of sacrificing the quality and look of the images I produce for anything. I know that every photographer has his or her opinion about which is superior, film or digital. For me, film is what makes my heart happy and emotionally ties me to my images.

http://www.tanjalippertphotography.com

http://instagram.com/tanjalippert

https://twitter.com/TanjaLippert

Sharing Our Images – post from Reid Callanan

“We’ve enjoyed a long relationship with the Santa Fe Workshop, led by Reid Callanan and we’re thrilled to have a blog post from him today. Reid’s passion for photography is matched only by his desire to help others become better at it. In addition to the many workshops his organization runs, he runs Photo Teens, which introduces young adults to the world of photography. Reid tells us a bit more about the program, and why film is an important part of that  workshop.” – Audrey

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When I was a young man (40 years ago) I grew up in a photographic world of film and black-and-white prints made in a darkroom. I learned the craft of photography getting my hands wet. Fast forward to 2013, and today’s youth are growing up in photographic universe almost completely unrecognizable from a technology standpoint. Their world of pictures is a digital one using cell phones to post their pictures to Facebook and Instagram. What a world of difference in a few short years!

At the same time, young adults who work with film are continually amazed by the experience and results, and react to photography created with film much differently from that created via digital. As director of the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops, I believe in getting teens excited about photography by watching an image rise and take form in a tray of developer and sharing the resulting print with their friends face-to-face. For this very reason, we teach our Photo Teens summer workshop program using film and printing paper. These silver-halide materials and the uniquely magical process in the darkroom excites and inspires these teen’s creativity and self expression unlike anything in their digital domain. This traditional photographic start opens an entirely new world for their dreams and visions.

Kodak Alaris has been a long-time supporter of our Photo Teens workshops over the past ten years and their materials have enabled our teens’ photographic vision to come to light. Here are a few images made by the participants in this summer’s Photo Teens workshop here in Santa Fe:

Michelle La Sage Ryan Williamson Sharing images is at the core of being a photographer, whether making silver prints or digital images. One fun and rewarding way to share our images is entering photography contests. Entering contests affords us an opportunity to evaluate our images and choose our best work. Then we get to see if our best work is considered by the contest judges to be the best work submitted. Being recognized and acknowledged for our best work is a rewarding experience for any photographer. And if we are so honored, we get to share our best work around the world. And the prizes are nice too.

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Our upcoming photo contest from the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops is themed BACKYARD and will run from September 19 through November 19. Kodak Alaris has generously provided professional film as prizes for all four major contest winners, and we have provided free workshops, and many other photographic companies have provided prizes as well. Check out the details for BACKYARD here http://www.santafeworkshops.com/contest/.

Reid Callanan Director,
Santa Fe Photographic Workshops

Twitter Chat with FILM photographers Aug 20

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UPDATE! THE CHAT TIME HAS BEEN MOVED TO 4PM EST, TUESDAY, AUG 20TH. 

We have some exciting news! Remember last March when we first featured the {F} Network here on 1000Words? Well, it’s almost time for the new season. To help everyone get ready, next Tuesday, August 20th at 5pm EST 4pm EST (NOTE UPDATED TIME!), we’re teaming up with the awesome photographers from FILM! Season 2 for a Twitter Chat. That’s right – the group behind [F} Network show’s popular educational and inspirational FILM! Season 2 will join us on  Twitter to talk about their experiences and give us a sneak peak of what we can expect in the new season. Wondering when Season 2 starts? They’ll tell us that, too.

Oh, and at the end of the chat… wait for it… there will be a Kodak film giveaway!

So next Tuesday at 5pm, fire up TweetDeck, TwitterChat or your Twitter app of choice, and follow the hashtag #KFchat to catch the conversation. Include #KFchat in your tweets so we can see what you have to share.

No doubt  we’ll all have lots to share after a day of picture taking on World Photography Day, the day before the chat!

Here are the photographers from FILM that will be participating so be sure to follow them on Twitter:

Tanja Lippert @tanjaLippert

Jonas Peterson @jonaspeterson

Ryan Muirhead @rnmphotography

Jan Scholz  @micmojo

And follow me @KodakCB for chat instructions, information, conversation starters and yes… the film giveaway and the schedule for FILM! Season 2.

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Shooting film by Matt Osborne

The Kodak 1000 word Film Friday blog is a dedicated platform where we feature great photographers sharing our passion for film photography.

Today we’re excited to feature a photographer from the UK, Matt Osborne. We discovered Matt following a fashion film shoot in Ukraine where he shot a model in black and white on Kodak Professional T-MAX 400 film. Here, in this blog post Matt talks about his passion for film photography and his use of Kodak film. Being a professional model and wedding photographer, Matt prefers to work with a mixture of film formats and cameras for different scenarios.

Take a look at Matt’s images and make up your own mind, then why not pick up a camera, buy some Kodak film and take some great shots yourself.

- Lars Fiedler

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Shooting film by Matt Osborne, Photographer, UK

I am a self taught model and wedding photographer and have been shooting for around four years. Towards the end of 2012 I was already shooting my digital Nikon D800 camera in full manual mode using some of the best legacy lenses ever produced but I needed more.  It was here that my journey with film began.  I started with a Contax 645 medium format film camera as I loved the wedding photography examples I had seen during my research shooting Kodak Professional Portra 400 film.  The skin tones are just unmatchable with digital.

Living in the UK, the light levels are often much lower especially in the winter months.  For this reason I often shoot Kodak Professional Portra 800 which allows me to photograph UK models and weddings with the same high quality and characteristic skin tones yet still with available light.  The Contax standard Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm f2 lens is a fast lens meaning it can be used in lower light situations. In this instance I can often use Kodak Professional Portra 400.  When I use my Mamiya RZ Pro II 6×7 however the lens are often f3.5 or f4.5 (200% less bright) so more light or faster film is required.  It is here than Kodak Professional Portra 800 saves me every time.   When large medium format film negatives are scanned I think it would be difficult to distinguish between Kodak Professional Portra 400 and Kodak Professional Portra 800.

Example - ARAX-CM and ARAX 80mm f2.8 lens, 120 Kodak Professional Portra 800 film, Agnieszka, Poland.

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My passion however is black and white film photography and I develop my own film using a mix of Kodak Professional Xtol and Agfa Rodinal.  I find I tend to see photos in black and white, pools of light and shadows.  I’m not sure if it is something I have developed or trained my eyes to see or just something I’m lucky to have.  Even with digital I tend to shoot B&W JPEGs.  For black and white film photography my favourite films are Kodak T-Max 100 and Kodak T-Max 400.  When shooting 35mm film I use a Nikon FM body then all my Nikon lenses I had invested in for digital.  As I like to use fast prime lens (85mm f1.4, 50mm f1.2, 200mm f2) I can shoot with available light more easily so I tend to use Kodak Professional T-Max 100.  This fast film gives ultrafine grain so when scanned the images look almost digital yet better as they have texture and a 3D quality.

Example – Nikon FM and Samyang 85mm f1.4 lens, 35mm Kodak Professional T-Max 100 film, Andra, UK

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Film gives an apparent extra layer of detail that cannot be achieved with digital.  For the Contax 645 and the fast Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm f2 lens I also shoot Kodak Professional T-Max 100 however for my other medium format cameras I need faster film.

My most used film camera is a medium format re branded Russian Kiev 88 6×6 camera badged as an ARAX-CM.  The camera is also known as a Hasselbladski as is a Soviet copy of the famous Hasselblad.  I love the 6×6 format and the camera is compact so is my first choice when I need to fit a medium format film camera into my hand luggage.  I love the no frills shooting. No battery, no light meter, just a box, a lens and some film.  This lets me channel all my energy into each photo resulting in often better composed and more thought through images.  The ARAX lenses tend to be f2.8 or f3.5 but for super sharp images stopping the lenses down to f5.6 can give the most striking and high quality results.  Stopping down the lenses means I need more light or faster film.  Living in the UK the first is not an option in the winter months so I shoot Kodak T-Max 400 film.  As with the Kodak Professional Portra 800, when T-Max 400 is scanned it would be difficult to tell it from Kodak T-Max 100.  Both offer exceptional B&W tonal ranges and super film grain.

Example - ARAX-CM and Mir 38v lens, 120 Kodak Professional T-Max 400 film,  Yulya, Ukraine.

MatthewOsborne-PhotoOfMeExample - ARAX-CM and Mir 38v lens, 120 Kodak Professional T-Max 400 film,  Yulya, Ukraine.#3.TMax400,ARAX-CM, Yulya

I feel my journey with film is just beginning and I hope to enjoy many more years with Kodak.  I already offer film photography for weddings but hope to attract a niche market in the future for those who like to enjoy the finer things in life.

To find out more about Matt Osborne please visit:

http://www.matthewosbornephotography.co.uk/

or follow his blog and Flickr pages at

http://matthewosbornephotography.wordpress.com/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/32681588@N03/

Films Not Dead winner – Guillaume Périmony

Recently, when Film’s Not Dead (F.N.D.)ran its  Kodak Moments competition, hundreds of photographers submitted pretty amazing images shot on Kodak film. F.N.D., founded by Charlie Abiss, Tori Khambhaita and Jamie Rothwell, brings together like-minded photographers who enjoy the benefits that film photography offers and to provide information on film availability within the UK, while sharing imaginative, thought provoking images.  Together, the group, after reviewing all the submissions, named French photographer Guillaume Périmony, as the winner. We’re thrilled to feature Périmony, 28,  who tells us why he shoots film and allows us to share some of his favourite black and white pictures shot on KODAK PROFESSIONAL Tri-X film. Thank you to F.N.D. for its commitment to the film community and congratulations to Périmony on his award winning submission. – Lars

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I’ve been shooting film since I took up photography in 2002, so have been using it for more than ten years. The process of using film requires much more patience,  desire and passion, however the result of shooting film gives me a unique feeling of satisfaction and professionalism about my photography skills.

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I shoot using an Olympus OM1 camera and most often load Kodak Tri-X, not only is it the most cost efficent black and white film to use, I also find it the easiest to shoot.  Tri-X brings a classic look and feel to my images and you can still have a good shot even if you miss your exposure.

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More importantly for me as an amateur film photographer is that I find that shooting film enables my cameras to have a longer usage span.  I don’t have to worry about my camera not being the latest technology, or it not supporting specific software etc. That coupled with the added benefit of knowing that my printed images will last a lot longer than digital images and aren’t going to be stored away on a drive that may become corrupt or ‘out of date’means a lot to photographers like me. Shooting film and printing images means that I can simply enjoy the camera I want, the way I want, with the film I want – which I am much more confident about and the end result is something slid and touchable!”

- Guillaume Périmony

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As a keen skateboarder, Périmony spends a lot of his time on the street and this is often where he shoots, both still and action shots of the ‘life in a skate park’ etc.  When not on four small wheels, Périmony likes to shoot images of interesting people.   You can see more of Périmony’s work on his Flickr gallery http://www.flickr.com/photos/guiom/.

You can also find out more about Périmony and his winning image ‘Burmese Days’ on the Films Not Dead blog.

Kinfolk Magazine and Kodak Film

Nothing would be more tiresome than eating and drinking if God had not made them a pleasure as well as a necessity.  ~Voltaire  85250016-45

As the temperatures rise and life slows down, friends and families gather around pools, picnic tables, campfires, outdoor cafes and roof top decks to share good meals and a cold drink. Some people will stay in town. Others will hit the open road. Some will follow time honored summer traditions while others strike out in search of new adventures.

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Kinfolk Magazine embodies all of these things. It’s more a keepsake coffee book than a magazine. Each issue includes, as the publisher aptly describes it “lush photography, lyrical essays, recipes, interviews, profiles, personal stories and practical tips along with a keen attention to design and details.” Woven among all of this are the themes of discovering, making and doing new things.

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We are honored that Kinfolk makes KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA 160 and 400 an integral part of the creation of such a simply beautiful publication.  Its pages and website include work from a roster of talented photographers, like Parker Fitzgerald, Tec Petaja, Leo Patrone, Jay Fitzgerald, Laura Dart and Carissa Gallo.

We first learned about Kinfolk last fall when we met Parker Fitzgerald. He asked “Might Kodak have any interest in working with this magazine, Kinfolk?” After reviewing just a few images, we were hooked. Our film, put in the hands of these photographers, could only result in beautiful images. Each of their photographs inspires – a recipe to make, a gathering to host, a culture to experience, a memory to create.

We invite you to grab a copy, visit the website and find your own inspiration this summer.

Kinfolk is a quarterly, 144-page, ad-free print magazine.  In addition to the print edition, Kinfolk recently launched Kinfolk Digital.

You can follow Kinfolk on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/kinfolkmag), on Twitter (@kinfolkmag) and Instagram (@Kinfolkmag). 

Cole Barash, Iceland and Kodak Film

On the very first portrait Cole Barash went to shoot for his feature on Iceland, “64.133 ºN/21.9333 ºW” in this month’s Relapse Magazine, one of his lights blew up.  Blew. Up.

“Yeah, it’s not like you’re able to run to Adorama and pick up a new light,” said Barash. “So I just stripped my kit to basically a one-light set up with a fill option. It pushed me a little bit to use just that and not have so many options. OK.”

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At 25, Barash has photographed campaigns for Adidas, Nike, Rag and Bone, Brixton and Burton. A die-hard film user, Barash’s laid-back persona belies the strength of his creative vision, his disciplined approach to photography and respect for the medium and its history. That drew Relapse Editor Ian Frisch to his work.

“The concept of film in relationship to his photography even furthers my view of him as a true photographer,” said Frisch. “Rather than picking up the newest and flashiest equipment, Cole utilizes the history and foundations of photography, in a physical sense, to capture moments in a way that people have been doing for decades that, in some instances, the younger generation has lost touch with. His passion for photography, across the board, is something that is very rare now-a-days, and something that I hold in the highest respect.”

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Barash headed to Iceland with 100 rolls of film to shoot a personal project. When Frisch heard about Barash’s trip, he asked him to do a shoot for Relapse featuring the increasingly influential arts and fashion scene in Iceland. Relapse, founded in 2012, showcases edgy, progressive fashion photography and provocative culture journalism.

With not a lot of time or pre-planning, Barash moved quickly to find and create compelling portraits of designers and artists who make up this community and culture.  That same creative vision and work ethic he uses in the back bowls of Canada worked in the studios of Reykjavík.

“Shooting snowboarding out in the back country has taught me a lot. You can’t exactly run 200 feet through waist deep snow to go check an angle,” said Barash. “You really start to put yourself in that 200 foot position and how it’s going to frame up and what it’s going to look at. You need to go find the best angle quick.”

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In Iceland, when shooting designers, “as soon as I got into their studio, I made some quick decisions on how their brand and how they as a person would be interpreted to me – light and flashy, dark and moody, vibrant and atrocious.”

For the bands, Barash wanted to create photographs that conveyed the feeling of Iceland, as well as the band members themselves.

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In all cases, Barash moved fast – deciding how he wanted to shoot, the tools he would use to shoot and the need to focus his energy on making a connection with the subjects.

“I knew the tools I had and what I could do with them. I kind of quickly made decisions about the environment – where I wanted to shoot them and how I wanted to light it. Then I just started shooting.”

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Barash shot mostly with KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA 160, with a bit of  KODAK PROFESSIONAL TRI-X thrown in.

“I love the tones on PORTRA, especially on the skin – I haven’t found anything better,” said Barash. “It’s very soft and fairly muted, but not so muted it feels desaturated; very good contrast.”

“TRI-X – generally the contrast and the grain is pretty spot on for what I like to shoot. Especially when you start developing different filters and process,” said Barash. “I think I’ve been shooting it for so long that I know how something’s going to look on a negative.”

The latest issue of Relapse Magazine is available now in New York at Barnes and Noble Union Square, Soho International News, McNally Jackson Bookstore, Lafayette Smokeshop, Bouwerie Iconic, and Bedford Exotics in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. It is also available through the iTunes Store on all participating mobile devices.

For more on Cole Barash, visit

ColeBarash.com

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Instagram: @nomadda.

And for more on Relapse Magazine, visit

http://relapsemag.com.

Instagram: @relapsemagazine