Sharing Our Images – post from Reid Callanan

“We’ve enjoyed a long relationship with the Santa Fe Workshop, led by Reid Callanan and we’re thrilled to have a blog post from him today. Reid’s passion for photography is matched only by his desire to help others become better at it. In addition to the many workshops his organization runs, he runs Photo Teens, which introduces young adults to the world of photography. Reid tells us a bit more about the program, and why film is an important part of that  workshop.” – Audrey

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When I was a young man (40 years ago) I grew up in a photographic world of film and black-and-white prints made in a darkroom. I learned the craft of photography getting my hands wet. Fast forward to 2013, and today’s youth are growing up in photographic universe almost completely unrecognizable from a technology standpoint. Their world of pictures is a digital one using cell phones to post their pictures to Facebook and Instagram. What a world of difference in a few short years!

At the same time, young adults who work with film are continually amazed by the experience and results, and react to photography created with film much differently from that created via digital. As director of the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops, I believe in getting teens excited about photography by watching an image rise and take form in a tray of developer and sharing the resulting print with their friends face-to-face. For this very reason, we teach our Photo Teens summer workshop program using film and printing paper. These silver-halide materials and the uniquely magical process in the darkroom excites and inspires these teen’s creativity and self expression unlike anything in their digital domain. This traditional photographic start opens an entirely new world for their dreams and visions.

Kodak Alaris has been a long-time supporter of our Photo Teens workshops over the past ten years and their materials have enabled our teens’ photographic vision to come to light. Here are a few images made by the participants in this summer’s Photo Teens workshop here in Santa Fe:

Michelle La Sage Ryan Williamson Sharing images is at the core of being a photographer, whether making silver prints or digital images. One fun and rewarding way to share our images is entering photography contests. Entering contests affords us an opportunity to evaluate our images and choose our best work. Then we get to see if our best work is considered by the contest judges to be the best work submitted. Being recognized and acknowledged for our best work is a rewarding experience for any photographer. And if we are so honored, we get to share our best work around the world. And the prizes are nice too.

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Our upcoming photo contest from the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops is themed BACKYARD and will run from September 19 through November 19. Kodak Alaris has generously provided professional film as prizes for all four major contest winners, and we have provided free workshops, and many other photographic companies have provided prizes as well. Check out the details for BACKYARD here http://www.santafeworkshops.com/contest/.

Reid Callanan Director,
Santa Fe Photographic Workshops

Twitter Chat with FILM photographers Aug 20

[F]network

UPDATE! THE CHAT TIME HAS BEEN MOVED TO 4PM EST, TUESDAY, AUG 20TH. 

We have some exciting news! Remember last March when we first featured the {F} Network here on 1000Words? Well, it’s almost time for the new season. To help everyone get ready, next Tuesday, August 20th at 5pm EST 4pm EST (NOTE UPDATED TIME!), we’re teaming up with the awesome photographers from FILM! Season 2 for a Twitter Chat. That’s right – the group behind [F} Network show’s popular educational and inspirational FILM! Season 2 will join us on  Twitter to talk about their experiences and give us a sneak peak of what we can expect in the new season. Wondering when Season 2 starts? They’ll tell us that, too.

Oh, and at the end of the chat… wait for it… there will be a Kodak film giveaway!

So next Tuesday at 5pm, fire up TweetDeck, TwitterChat or your Twitter app of choice, and follow the hashtag #KFchat to catch the conversation. Include #KFchat in your tweets so we can see what you have to share.

No doubt  we’ll all have lots to share after a day of picture taking on World Photography Day, the day before the chat!

Here are the photographers from FILM that will be participating so be sure to follow them on Twitter:

Tanja Lippert @tanjaLippert

Jonas Peterson @jonaspeterson

Ryan Muirhead @rnmphotography

Jan Scholz  @micmojo

And follow me @KodakCB for chat instructions, information, conversation starters and yes… the film giveaway and the schedule for FILM! Season 2.

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Shooting film by Matt Osborne

The Kodak 1000 word Film Friday blog is a dedicated platform where we feature great photographers sharing our passion for film photography.

Today we’re excited to feature a photographer from the UK, Matt Osborne. We discovered Matt following a fashion film shoot in Ukraine where he shot a model in black and white on Kodak Professional T-MAX 400 film. Here, in this blog post Matt talks about his passion for film photography and his use of Kodak film. Being a professional model and wedding photographer, Matt prefers to work with a mixture of film formats and cameras for different scenarios.

Take a look at Matt’s images and make up your own mind, then why not pick up a camera, buy some Kodak film and take some great shots yourself.

- Lars Fiedler

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Shooting film by Matt Osborne, Photographer, UK

I am a self taught model and wedding photographer and have been shooting for around four years. Towards the end of 2012 I was already shooting my digital Nikon D800 camera in full manual mode using some of the best legacy lenses ever produced but I needed more.  It was here that my journey with film began.  I started with a Contax 645 medium format film camera as I loved the wedding photography examples I had seen during my research shooting Kodak Professional Portra 400 film.  The skin tones are just unmatchable with digital.

Living in the UK, the light levels are often much lower especially in the winter months.  For this reason I often shoot Kodak Professional Portra 800 which allows me to photograph UK models and weddings with the same high quality and characteristic skin tones yet still with available light.  The Contax standard Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm f2 lens is a fast lens meaning it can be used in lower light situations. In this instance I can often use Kodak Professional Portra 400.  When I use my Mamiya RZ Pro II 6×7 however the lens are often f3.5 or f4.5 (200% less bright) so more light or faster film is required.  It is here than Kodak Professional Portra 800 saves me every time.   When large medium format film negatives are scanned I think it would be difficult to distinguish between Kodak Professional Portra 400 and Kodak Professional Portra 800.

Example - ARAX-CM and ARAX 80mm f2.8 lens, 120 Kodak Professional Portra 800 film, Agnieszka, Poland.

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My passion however is black and white film photography and I develop my own film using a mix of Kodak Professional Xtol and Agfa Rodinal.  I find I tend to see photos in black and white, pools of light and shadows.  I’m not sure if it is something I have developed or trained my eyes to see or just something I’m lucky to have.  Even with digital I tend to shoot B&W JPEGs.  For black and white film photography my favourite films are Kodak T-Max 100 and Kodak T-Max 400.  When shooting 35mm film I use a Nikon FM body then all my Nikon lenses I had invested in for digital.  As I like to use fast prime lens (85mm f1.4, 50mm f1.2, 200mm f2) I can shoot with available light more easily so I tend to use Kodak Professional T-Max 100.  This fast film gives ultrafine grain so when scanned the images look almost digital yet better as they have texture and a 3D quality.

Example – Nikon FM and Samyang 85mm f1.4 lens, 35mm Kodak Professional T-Max 100 film, Andra, UK

#2b. TMax100,35mm,NikonFM,SquCrop,MatthewOsborne

#2.TMax 100,35mm,NikonFM,MatthewOsborne

Film gives an apparent extra layer of detail that cannot be achieved with digital.  For the Contax 645 and the fast Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm f2 lens I also shoot Kodak Professional T-Max 100 however for my other medium format cameras I need faster film.

My most used film camera is a medium format re branded Russian Kiev 88 6×6 camera badged as an ARAX-CM.  The camera is also known as a Hasselbladski as is a Soviet copy of the famous Hasselblad.  I love the 6×6 format and the camera is compact so is my first choice when I need to fit a medium format film camera into my hand luggage.  I love the no frills shooting. No battery, no light meter, just a box, a lens and some film.  This lets me channel all my energy into each photo resulting in often better composed and more thought through images.  The ARAX lenses tend to be f2.8 or f3.5 but for super sharp images stopping the lenses down to f5.6 can give the most striking and high quality results.  Stopping down the lenses means I need more light or faster film.  Living in the UK the first is not an option in the winter months so I shoot Kodak T-Max 400 film.  As with the Kodak Professional Portra 800, when T-Max 400 is scanned it would be difficult to tell it from Kodak T-Max 100.  Both offer exceptional B&W tonal ranges and super film grain.

Example - ARAX-CM and Mir 38v lens, 120 Kodak Professional T-Max 400 film,  Yulya, Ukraine.

MatthewOsborne-PhotoOfMeExample - ARAX-CM and Mir 38v lens, 120 Kodak Professional T-Max 400 film,  Yulya, Ukraine.#3.TMax400,ARAX-CM, Yulya

I feel my journey with film is just beginning and I hope to enjoy many more years with Kodak.  I already offer film photography for weddings but hope to attract a niche market in the future for those who like to enjoy the finer things in life.

To find out more about Matt Osborne please visit:

http://www.matthewosbornephotography.co.uk/

or follow his blog and Flickr pages at

http://matthewosbornephotography.wordpress.com/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/32681588@N03/

Films Not Dead winner – Guillaume Périmony

Recently, when Film’s Not Dead (F.N.D.)ran its  Kodak Moments competition, hundreds of photographers submitted pretty amazing images shot on Kodak film. F.N.D., founded by Charlie Abiss, Tori Khambhaita and Jamie Rothwell, brings together like-minded photographers who enjoy the benefits that film photography offers and to provide information on film availability within the UK, while sharing imaginative, thought provoking images.  Together, the group, after reviewing all the submissions, named French photographer Guillaume Périmony, as the winner. We’re thrilled to feature Périmony, 28,  who tells us why he shoots film and allows us to share some of his favourite black and white pictures shot on KODAK PROFESSIONAL Tri-X film. Thank you to F.N.D. for its commitment to the film community and congratulations to Périmony on his award winning submission. – Lars

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I’ve been shooting film since I took up photography in 2002, so have been using it for more than ten years. The process of using film requires much more patience,  desire and passion, however the result of shooting film gives me a unique feeling of satisfaction and professionalism about my photography skills.

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I shoot using an Olympus OM1 camera and most often load Kodak Tri-X, not only is it the most cost efficent black and white film to use, I also find it the easiest to shoot.  Tri-X brings a classic look and feel to my images and you can still have a good shot even if you miss your exposure.

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More importantly for me as an amateur film photographer is that I find that shooting film enables my cameras to have a longer usage span.  I don’t have to worry about my camera not being the latest technology, or it not supporting specific software etc. That coupled with the added benefit of knowing that my printed images will last a lot longer than digital images and aren’t going to be stored away on a drive that may become corrupt or ‘out of date’means a lot to photographers like me. Shooting film and printing images means that I can simply enjoy the camera I want, the way I want, with the film I want – which I am much more confident about and the end result is something slid and touchable!”

- Guillaume Périmony

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As a keen skateboarder, Périmony spends a lot of his time on the street and this is often where he shoots, both still and action shots of the ‘life in a skate park’ etc.  When not on four small wheels, Périmony likes to shoot images of interesting people.   You can see more of Périmony’s work on his Flickr gallery http://www.flickr.com/photos/guiom/.

You can also find out more about Périmony and his winning image ‘Burmese Days’ on the Films Not Dead blog.

Kinfolk Magazine and Kodak Film

Nothing would be more tiresome than eating and drinking if God had not made them a pleasure as well as a necessity.  ~Voltaire  85250016-45

As the temperatures rise and life slows down, friends and families gather around pools, picnic tables, campfires, outdoor cafes and roof top decks to share good meals and a cold drink. Some people will stay in town. Others will hit the open road. Some will follow time honored summer traditions while others strike out in search of new adventures.

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Kinfolk Magazine embodies all of these things. It’s more a keepsake coffee book than a magazine. Each issue includes, as the publisher aptly describes it “lush photography, lyrical essays, recipes, interviews, profiles, personal stories and practical tips along with a keen attention to design and details.” Woven among all of this are the themes of discovering, making and doing new things.

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We are honored that Kinfolk makes KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA 160 and 400 an integral part of the creation of such a simply beautiful publication.  Its pages and website include work from a roster of talented photographers, like Parker Fitzgerald, Tec Petaja, Leo Patrone, Jay Fitzgerald, Laura Dart and Carissa Gallo.

We first learned about Kinfolk last fall when we met Parker Fitzgerald. He asked “Might Kodak have any interest in working with this magazine, Kinfolk?” After reviewing just a few images, we were hooked. Our film, put in the hands of these photographers, could only result in beautiful images. Each of their photographs inspires – a recipe to make, a gathering to host, a culture to experience, a memory to create.

We invite you to grab a copy, visit the website and find your own inspiration this summer.

Kinfolk is a quarterly, 144-page, ad-free print magazine.  In addition to the print edition, Kinfolk recently launched Kinfolk Digital.

You can follow Kinfolk on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/kinfolkmag), on Twitter (@kinfolkmag) and Instagram (@Kinfolkmag). 

Cole Barash, Iceland and Kodak Film

On the very first portrait Cole Barash went to shoot for his feature on Iceland, “64.133 ºN/21.9333 ºW” in this month’s Relapse Magazine, one of his lights blew up.  Blew. Up.

“Yeah, it’s not like you’re able to run to Adorama and pick up a new light,” said Barash. “So I just stripped my kit to basically a one-light set up with a fill option. It pushed me a little bit to use just that and not have so many options. OK.”

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At 25, Barash has photographed campaigns for Adidas, Nike, Rag and Bone, Brixton and Burton. A die-hard film user, Barash’s laid-back persona belies the strength of his creative vision, his disciplined approach to photography and respect for the medium and its history. That drew Relapse Editor Ian Frisch to his work.

“The concept of film in relationship to his photography even furthers my view of him as a true photographer,” said Frisch. “Rather than picking up the newest and flashiest equipment, Cole utilizes the history and foundations of photography, in a physical sense, to capture moments in a way that people have been doing for decades that, in some instances, the younger generation has lost touch with. His passion for photography, across the board, is something that is very rare now-a-days, and something that I hold in the highest respect.”

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Barash headed to Iceland with 100 rolls of film to shoot a personal project. When Frisch heard about Barash’s trip, he asked him to do a shoot for Relapse featuring the increasingly influential arts and fashion scene in Iceland. Relapse, founded in 2012, showcases edgy, progressive fashion photography and provocative culture journalism.

With not a lot of time or pre-planning, Barash moved quickly to find and create compelling portraits of designers and artists who make up this community and culture.  That same creative vision and work ethic he uses in the back bowls of Canada worked in the studios of Reykjavík.

“Shooting snowboarding out in the back country has taught me a lot. You can’t exactly run 200 feet through waist deep snow to go check an angle,” said Barash. “You really start to put yourself in that 200 foot position and how it’s going to frame up and what it’s going to look at. You need to go find the best angle quick.”

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In Iceland, when shooting designers, “as soon as I got into their studio, I made some quick decisions on how their brand and how they as a person would be interpreted to me – light and flashy, dark and moody, vibrant and atrocious.”

For the bands, Barash wanted to create photographs that conveyed the feeling of Iceland, as well as the band members themselves.

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In all cases, Barash moved fast – deciding how he wanted to shoot, the tools he would use to shoot and the need to focus his energy on making a connection with the subjects.

“I knew the tools I had and what I could do with them. I kind of quickly made decisions about the environment – where I wanted to shoot them and how I wanted to light it. Then I just started shooting.”

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Barash shot mostly with KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA 160, with a bit of  KODAK PROFESSIONAL TRI-X thrown in.

“I love the tones on PORTRA, especially on the skin – I haven’t found anything better,” said Barash. “It’s very soft and fairly muted, but not so muted it feels desaturated; very good contrast.”

“TRI-X – generally the contrast and the grain is pretty spot on for what I like to shoot. Especially when you start developing different filters and process,” said Barash. “I think I’ve been shooting it for so long that I know how something’s going to look on a negative.”

The latest issue of Relapse Magazine is available now in New York at Barnes and Noble Union Square, Soho International News, McNally Jackson Bookstore, Lafayette Smokeshop, Bouwerie Iconic, and Bedford Exotics in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. It is also available through the iTunes Store on all participating mobile devices.

For more on Cole Barash, visit

ColeBarash.com

Nomadda.tumblr.com

Instagram: @nomadda.

And for more on Relapse Magazine, visit

http://relapsemag.com.

Instagram: @relapsemagazine

Michael Raso: For the Love of Film – The 2013 FPP Walking Workshop

Today’s Film Friday blog post comes from Michael Raso

This past April 12-14, more than 50 film-minded professional and amateur photographers converged on the town of Findlay, Ohio to attend the first official mid-west Film Photography Project (FPP) Walking Workshop.  It was a fluid, fun weekend of casual instructions on all formats of traditional photography including 35mm, 120, 4×5 and 8×10, perfectly complemented by Kodak film.

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I wanted attendees to use some Kodak films that I shoot.  If you haven’t used it yet, PORTRA 800 is a beautiful addition to the PORTRA 160 and PORTRA 400 line of film. I’ve been shooting PORTRA 800 and wanted to share this experience with our attendees.  And, with so many Film Photography Podcast listeners shooting Kodak Tri-X film, I was thrilled to put rolls of Kodak T-Max 100 and 400 in their hands. The Kodak T-Max BW films are the sharpest BW films on the planet!

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The Findley, Ohio FPP Walking Workshop attendees were an amazing, diverse group of men and women of all ages. It was especially awesome to see 30-year Kodak veteran Dale Deven assisting a student on how to load a 35mm Leica camera. Previous FPP meet-ups, held in New York and London, were the inspiration for Findley’s more structured and instructional event – our biggest successes to date.

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Why shoot film in a world gone digital, you might ask?  For me, film remains the best and most satisfying medium.  I love the aesthetic, the process…and creating tangible assets I can archive.  I’m so glad that I’m not the only person that feels that way.

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In 2009, I launched the Film Photography Project (FPP) as an Internet radio show. With my years of broadcast experience, I thought that a radio show about film would be lots of fun. I had no idea that thousand upon thousands of people who were also as excited about film would be regularly tuning in. The podcast soon became a source of inspiration and discovery for both my listeners and me. Not only was I using medium format and large formats for the first time but those tuning in were also sharing and learning as fast as episodes could be recorded and posted.  My YouTube channel of instructional videos followed shortly thereafter, as did the Film Photography Project website, an online resource for film shooters worldwide.  Now, with the FPP Walking Workshops facilitating instruction and exploration of film with film enthusiasts directly, what better way to spend the weekend than with other film-loving people?

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The Film Photography Projects offers ongoing educational blogs, videos and podcasts about using film via the website http://filmphotographyproject.com/

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If you’re interested in trying film for the first time, trying a bigger film format or even developing at home, please do visit our podcast archive. E-mail inquiries or questions: Podcast@FilmPhotographyProject.com

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Photos by Lance King, Leslie Lazenby, Mat Marrash and Michael Raso shot on Kodak Portra 400 and Tri-X Film.

Michael Raso is a photographer, producer and filmmaker working professionally in the visual arts for over 20 years; Michael is also the founder of the Film Photography Project and its fortnightly Internet radio show, the Film Photography Podcast. Michael’s goal?…to get as many people as possible to experience the joys of shooting with traditional film! 

Film’s Not Dead Store and Film Photography Gallery

FND

Back in 2010, three friends and lovers of film photography, Charlie Abiss, Tori Khambhaita and Jamie Rothwell got together and formed the Film’s not Dead (FND) group. They intended to bring together like-minded photographers who enjoy the benefits that film photography offers and to provide information on film availability within the UK, while sharing imaginative, thought provoking images.

Today FND has nearly 5000 followers on Facebook and has a regular stall in London’s famous Brick Lane market. Due to that success, FND has yesterday opened a permanent store and film photography gallery in the West End of London.

Fans and followers of the Film’s not Dead page enjoy discussions, take part in exciting competitions – such as ones from Kodak ourselves, and locate nearby venues where people can buy film or have film developed.

Now with the opening of a new store and gallery, FND will offer film photographers and fans so much more. Each month, on the upper floor, the gallery will host a collection of images shot on film by professional and amateur photographers. To launch the new space, Film’s not Dead is proud to open its new store and gallery with a collection from one of its own, Tori Khambhaita, with her unique “Printers” exhibition, which was shot using Kodak’s Tri-X film.

Tori’s ‘Printers’ project gained national press and won her the coveted title of Young Black and White photographer of the year 2012.  This isn’t only a photographic show; it’s an awe-inspiring exhibition of skills and the unseen faces that have powered London’s photographic printing industry for decades.

Dennis Watson - ® Tori Khambhaita

Dennis Watson – ® Tori Khambhaita

Tori has created something truly original, which bridges the gap between the prints and the printers. The prints are truly one off’s, as each printer in the shots has illustrated their creativity and style, which can never be duplicated. This exhibition not only shows you the faces behind the London print industry, it also shows the skills behind those faces.

Klaus Kalde - ® Tori Khambhaita

Klaus Kalde – ® Tori Khambhaita

Tori, who works with some of the featured printers, gained exclusive access to the darkrooms of her subjects. After photographing either inside or outside of the darkroom, she herself would return to Klaus Kalde’s, where she would develop her own rolls of film.

Lee Williams - Raipd Eye - ® Tori Khambhaita

Lee Williams – Raipd Eye – ® Tori Khambhaita

Upon developing the negatives, Tori returned to the printers themselves and asked them to reflect their personal styles and preferences in the final image, again making each photograph unique.  Some have chosen to stay safe whilst others have gone all out, which will leave the viewer wide eyed and open mouthed asking ‘how?’.

Nick Jones - Photofusion - ® Tori Khambhaita

Nick Jones – Photofusion – ® Tori Khambhaita

Aside from the prints Tori also asked these highly skilled craftsmen to state the story that preceded them. These handwritten anecdotes beautifully entwine to create an absolutely fabulous narrative of life within London’s photographic printing industry.

Robin Bell - ® Tori Khambhaita

Robin Bell – ® Tori Khambhaita

This show is a testament to all that support traditional photography and recognise the years of acquired skill it takes to call yourself a darkroom printer. Tori’s exhibition and images celebrates the master craftsmanship and style of these artists committed to traditional photographic printing. The knowledge of the featured men and women in the photographs have acquired on their journey is invaluable! Tori’s ‘Printers’ exhibition will run from 3rd May 2013 – 28th May 2013 at the new Film’s not Dead gallery and store.

Film’s not Dead
13 Mount Pleasant
London
WC1X 0AR

Opening Times: Mon – Fri: 11.00 – 6.00

Building & Shooting a 3D Pinhole Camera

last year a friend found the perfect birthday gift for someone who thought he everything, a 3d pinhole camera.

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i knew pinhole cameras existed, and i have several 3d cameras, but i never imagined someone made a 3d pinhole camera. it turns out a company called recesky makes one, but it needs assembly. the camera consists of a plastic snap together body. in addition to taking stereo paris, it also has an option of taking a panoramic image.

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fortunately, the assembly instructions were illustrated, but the text was unfortunately (for me) in chinese. a trip to google solved that problem for me by finding several on line videos showing how to assemble the camera. about an hour later, i had a fully assembled, ready to go, stereo pinhole camera.

the next challenge was learning how to use it. the first question was ‘what is the f stop?’. a closer inspection of the chinese instructions revealed that the stereo pinholes were f 128 and the panoramic pinhole was f 180. those f stops are off of most light meters scales, so i had to do a bit of interpolation when calculating the exposure

normally i would go out on a shoot with a few different film speeds, and a camera where i controlled the f stop and shutter speed. with this pinhole camera, i had an unchangeable f 128 aperture, and the best control i had over shutter speed was counting mississippi’s

my first mistake after seeing an f stop of 128 was going out on a bright sunny day with fast film. that combination resulted in exposure times faster than a Mississippi. the next try was on a more overcast day with slower film. that allowed me to do a 4 or 5 second exposure using a tripod

typically I shoot on slide film and mount the slides so they can be viewed in a special stereo viewer, but you can view the image below in stereo too if you follow these instructions in one of my past blog posts on stereo photography, on how to do parallel freeviewing

as you can see with the arches of the bridge, the pinhole ‘lenses’ produce some interesting distortions

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the arches should be symmetrical, not having that pushing forward effect

the ‘focus’ also produced an interesting soft feel that is usually produced with filters on a lens or with digital post filters

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after i started to get the hang of 4 second exposures, i wanted to make good use of that exposure time with water

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and later, just for fun, i tried doing stereo fireworks shots. normally, a fireworks shot uses a long exposure, so it seemed natural to try the pinhole camera to take some stereo pairs

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after having fun assembling and shooting with that pinhole camera, our next project is a “slr” pinhole camera made by kikkerland

PEOPLE v. PLACES

People Vs. Places (2 of 6)

Last fall, on Twitter, we came across Stephanie Bassos and Timothy Burkhart collaborators on People vs Places. In this double exposure project, Stephanie exposes a full roll of 35mm film of only “people,” and Timothy reloads the film again into the same camera, to imprint only “places” and locations to the same roll. These images are all the end result of their ongoing series and are unedited negatives straight from the camera. After seeing their project on Tumblr, we wanted to know more.

People Vs. Places (3 of 6)

What prompted your project?  

Stephanie Bassos: We both meet at our full time job, where we both work on various photographic projects at an online-based startup. We do a range of things from basic photo editing to smaller studio shoots. Our friendship sparked from casual conversation about our love for photography and the projects we were both currently working on outside of work, as well as other artists we were into at the moment.  Our styles seemed to come from opposite ends of the photographic spectrum, and we had an admiration for what the other was doing.

I prefer working with people and shooting portraits, while Tim shoots mostly landscapes and places that don’t directly include people. We had entertained the idea of collaborating on a photo shoot or project, but we couldn’t really nail down how to make it happen. Tim had been shooting with some older film cameras at the time and had an instance where he unknowingly double exposed a roll of film resulting in double exposures. He then realized that his camera wasn’t rewinding film all the way and allowed the same roll to be loaded again fairly easily. This occurrence seemed to be the perfect vehicle for us to bring our two styles together into one image as well as series. We have been shooting for around nine months now and sticking to the formula of me shooting only people and Tim shooting only places, although we each don’t know the specifics outside of that.

People Vs. Places (4 of 6)

How do you choose your subjects and the order in which you shoot?

SB: The order we shoot is completely random.  We don’t have a specific way (people first, or places first.)  We were originally passing the same camera back and forth after we finished shooting our respective subject, but that slowed the process significantly.  If we both had a trip planned at the same time and only one had the camera, it seemed counter productive. To solve the issue we bought another one of the cameras we were using and tested it to find that it had the same rewind issue as the original. This allowed us both to shoot simultaneously.  Now we both have a roll in our cameras at all times, and whoever finishes first gives it to the other to re-load.

Timothy Burkhart: We choose our subjects by observing our surroundings and just going about our daily lives. The people Stephanie shoots are mostly her friends, or candid strangers. The places I shoot are in transit or traveling.  The project definitely has a point and shoot aesthetic and vibe to it.  It’s rare that we go out to a specific place or find a specific person to shoot with-shoots aren’t premeditated.  The camera is always on us, so we just constantly have it in the back of our minds and we shoot our life as it happens.

People Vs. Places (5 of 6)

Why did you choose Kodak film for this project?

TB: When we first started shooting we used what was most available. Lots of camera shops have been closing up around us in Chicago, so we were picking up Kodak Gold 200 at the local pharmacy or corner store, which fit our needs of availability.  Kodak films in general always have a bit more saturation and warmer color tones than other manufacturers and this was something we both liked aesthetically. After we shot on Kodak Gold for a bit to get a feel for the project we switched to Portra 400, which gave us a little less grain and even better tones.  Now we go back and forth between those two and shoot whatever we have available. People Vs. Places (6 of 6)

 How does this fit in with your overall photography work/style? 

SB: It’s a pretty perfect project for both of us to do outside of our own freelance. It gives us a chance to focus on what we love shooting most, and also comes with an element of surprise when the film is finally developed. It keeps us constantly creating and observing and thinking about photography in a different way.  Rather than focusing on composition and style to create the photo we want constantly, we surrender some of those decisions and leave it up to fate and cross our fingers hoping the great “people” shot was overlaid by a perfect “places” shot.

TB: It throws us both out of our comfort zones a little because we are not able control the frame in it’s entirety… but that’s good for us because it forces us to not think too much about one specific shot. The project looks a lot different than anything we both do.  We both shoot in our own ways and have a cleaner shooting style, so doing this project is a way to break away from our own personal process and have some fun with an old camera and some film.

People v Places image 1