Kodak Alaris 2013 Photo Contest Winners

Every year in the frozen chills of winter, Kodak Alaris holds a company wide contest, which shares and displays the photographic talents of its employees. Let’s have a look at the 1st place winners of the 2013 Kodak Alaris Photo Contest.

James Casha: President’s Award
Photo: Spectacular House of Worship

“The image shows the Hagia Sophia Museum in Istanbul, and was taken during a weekend trip to Turkey last October. Every year I meet up with a group of old school friends. We live all over the place so we pick a different location every time. Last year we chose Istanbul and spent a couple of days soaking up the sights, sounds and smells of this amazing city. We visited the old markets and mosques and cruised the Bosphorus (stopping for lunch on the Asian side). We had a couple of very late nights putting the world to rights in the bars near our hotel in the Beyoglu district.” – James

James Casha - Spectacular House of Worship

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Bob Janiszewski: 1st Place – Novice Action
Photo: Irish Dancers

“Every year, during the week of St Patty’s Day, the Young School of Irish Dancers performs throughout the Rochester area. This includes providing a community service in reaching out to our seniors residing across several facilities. The picture was taken at the Highlands Senior Living Center in Pittsford, NY. In the words of one of the proud Moms – “This is a fabulous picture!  It brings emotions of joy, pride and determination to the viewer.” A black & white theme was used in order to convey unity and bring focus to the determination exhibited by these wonderful dancers as they were “keeping it together”.

The picture was taken without flash. Shot with a Canon EOS REBEL T3. Exposure Time – 1/200 seconds, F-Number – 4, ISOSpeedRatings – 3200, Aperture Value – F 4.00 and converted to black & white.” – Bob

Bob Janiszewski - Irish Dancers

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Scott Koelle: 1st Place – Novice Animals
Photo: Surprised Dog With a Mohawk

“The photo is of my daughter’s dog, Navii. We adopted her from the Rochester Animal Services shelter 2 years ago and she has been a wonderful addition to our family. I had held out for quite a few years but finally gave in to my daughter, Lydia’s persistent requests for a pet dog. As a mixed breed, Navii has some strange fur; both short and long hair with the latter being very “moldable”.

One sunny afternoon, Navii was sitting on my daughter’s lap and looking out the window. Lydia spiked up Navii’s hair and I grabbed my Kodak digital camera and snapped a photo. The image looked pretty good but the background was a bit too busy so I took another photo with a couch pillow as a backdrop for a more “studio look”.

Later, I played around with the color, brightness and contrast and decided the photo looked best as a black and white. When the photo contest was announced, I decided to enter. I had never entered a photo contest and certainly never expected to win an award but thought it would be fun anyways; which it was! Many thanks to the organizers!” – Scott

Scott Koelle - Surprised Dog With a Mohawk

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Mike Paternoster: 1st Place – Novice Landscape
Photo: No LifeGuard On Duty

“The picture was taken in July 2013 in North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. It was around 9:00 am and rain clouds moved in quickly that morning covering the sky as the lifeguard was preparing for the day. The sun was sporadically shining through the clouds and I took a few pictures as the light was in and out of the clouds. There was little wind — calm before the storm — that morning and I think the picture captured that feeling as the flag remained still.” – Mike

No Life Guard On Duty

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Mark Rolan: 1st Place – Novice Nature
Photo: Tree Blocking The Sun

“In October of 2013 I decided to get up early on a Saturday morning and photograph the full moon set over the Pacific. It was something that I’ve never seen before and would love to photograph. The set was between 6-7AM and I was on Double Peak Park in San Marcos, California watching it drop toward the ocean. I was set up with a tripod and Canon DSLR, just waiting. As the moon approached the horizon, clouds began to ruin the moment. I stood back and turned around to see the sun coming up behind this baron tree. I repositioned the tripod and camera for the attached picture. Still waiting for the next full moon.

Because of the criteria of the contest (not showing any man made features in the picture), I took a second picture showing a wooden fence. This is my favorite of the two.” – Mark

Mark Rolan

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Pam Zimmermann: 1st Place – Novice People
Summary of Picture: Girl Blowing on a Dandelion

“This photo was taken near the Chenango River in Earlville, NY. The subject is my beautiful niece, Morgan, from Haverhill, MA. Every year at Thanksgiving, we have an annual photo session with all of my nieces and nephews. We work hard every year to fill the pages of a much-anticipated family calendar. The kids do handstands, cartwheels, silly pictures and serious poses. The girls were playing with the dandelions – and I just happened to snap this one of Morgan blowing on the dandelion.” – Pam

Pam Zimmermann - Girl Blowing on a Dandelion

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Pam Zimmermann: 1st Place – Novice Pictorial
Photo: Black And White Flower Collage

“This series of photos were taken in my backyard in Rochester, NY. I used my iPad mini to capture various images of some chives growing in my garden. I then used an App and made them into a collage.” – Pam

Pam Zimmermann - Black And White Flower Collage

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James Casha: 1st Place – Advanced Animals
Photo: A Tail of Two Kitties

“There cats are semi-wild and live in a cemetery in Zejtun, Malta. Their caretaker and a few local residents feed them. I took a lot of photos of them whilst waiting at a bus stop. They were not terribly cooperative but I managed to get a few nice shots.” – James

James Casha - A Tale of Two Kitties

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James Casha: 1st Place – Advanced People
Photo: Kids Playing in a Water Park

“This fountain is located in St George’s Square in Valletta – the capital city of the Mediterranean island of Malta. Every hour, water is turned on and the fountains ‘dance’ to classical music from hidden loudspeakers. On hot summer days, the fountains are popular cooling off place for children – locals and tourists alike. As well as piped music and fountains, St George Square also offers free Wi-Fi access to it’s visitors. It was whilst sitting on a bench accessing my Facebook that I snapped this picture.” – James

James Casha - Kids Playing in a Water Park

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Richard Scotto: 1st Place – Advanced People
Photo: Field of Hats

“Last year we went to one of the smaller islands in the Canary Isles called La Palma. On the Monday before Shrove Tuesday we visited the capital Santa Crus and found everyone dressed in white and wearing hats. We had stumbled across an amazing Fiesta called Los Indianos. After the Spanish established an empire in Central and South America, many people left La Palma to seek a new life in the New World. Some made their fortune and returned to La Palma where there was some resentment to these “noveau riche” from the locals. Everyone dressing in white, some in elegant suits, some in plain “peasant garb”, commemorates it each year. Everyone wears a hat and they pelt one another with talcum powder!

I was walking along the heavily thronged Main Street and saw these huge gatherings of people in the main square. I managed to climb a low wall and hang onto its railings to take this shot of the multitude of people all wearing their hats.” – Richard

Richard Scotto - Field of Hats

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Dan Olean: 1st Place – Landscape
Photo: Sun Still Setting on A Glacier

DanOlean-GullfossWaterfall-Iceland

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Dan Olean: 1st Place & Best in Show – Nature
Photo: Lighted Ice in The Land of Fire and Ice

DanOlean-IcelandsDiamonds-JokulsarlonGlacierLagoon-Iceland

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Dan Olean – 1st Place – Action
Photo: Still Shooting The Curl

“Every summer, I vacation with my extended family at Rehoboth Beach, Delaware. It is a wonderful beach to enjoy the sun, sand, and water for both the young and old. I go in the water, not only to cool off, but to take photos from a unique perspective of my son, niece, and nephew! Everyone takes photos of their kids on the beach, how could we resist? There are always parents taking photos of their kids in the water or playing in the surf from the safety of the sand, as I have too. But once I ventured out into the water with my camera, the view became more interesting and the photos more spectacular! I felt I was now able to capture not only the feelings of the subject, but the feeling of the ocean as well. And weather I am sitting in wet sand, lying in ankle deep water, or waiting in waist high; I could get close and capture that special photo! This image from last year was on a day when the ocean was unusually active, with 5-8 foot waves rolling in one right after another. Boy, does that draw people into the water! The waves were big enough so that they curled over and formed a small pipe, which, many kids were body surfing and boogie boarding on. I just had to capture that “Hawaiian Tube” on the Atlantic! To do so, I had to stand where the waves were breaking and follow them in as they rolled and crashed over me. I had the camera set in burst mode and just held it in front of me, pointing down the wave, keeping as low as possible to avoid being washing in with crash. Yes, I got tossed around a bit too, with a few waves taking me for a tumble, yeah that hurt!   I took hundreds of photos, with many waves, not knowing what I may have shot. After reviewing them later and tossing out the green and yellow totally underwater ones, I managed to get a few good shots! Worth it? I would do it again!” – Dan

DCIM100GOPRO

Answering your questions from LinkedIn

It has been a little more than a month since I began my responsibilities as Kodak Alaris’ Chief Executive Officer. So that I could immediately connect with you at that time, I invited you to ask me questions via a LinkedIn post on Kodak Alaris’ company page.

To provide you with answers, I’m posting this blog so that everyone can see the Q&A in an easy-to-follow format. Please let me know if you have any more questions for me or feedback.

Thank you for engaging with me on LinkedIn.

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Alex Wellman: I appreciate that you were able to use the principles of economies of scale to create a company that still produces value from traditional products while also continuing to innovate. This is an extremely admirable trait for any company. Do you have any jobs available?

Ralf Gerbershagen: Thanks for your feedback, Alex. Yes, we do have positions available. You can visit our career center, if you’re interested. The address is http://www.kodak.com/ek/US/en/Career_Opportunities.htm. You can learn more about Kodak Alaris there too.

 

Peter George: Kodak’s huge investment in analogue photography in the past meant that when digital came the rate of change was so fast they could not react in time. Has Kodak Alaris taken this on board and will it be an innovator once again? If so what disruptive technologies do you foresee Kodak pioneering in the future?

RG: Appreciate the question, Peter. My passions include driving long-term growth by way of innovation, empowerment, and accountability. And those passions are behind everything I want to do for Kodak Alaris and our customers to enable success for all.

I am looking at the whole company at the moment and how we can expand. There are huge opportunities here. In Personalized Imaging (PI), we have more than 100,000 kiosks worldwide, with strong retail channels. In social networks, there are millions and millions of pictures that people never dig out. Our charter is to look into this and see how we can get people closer to the pictures they have, how we can get all the pictures of their lives back in front of them, and what method would we develop On the Document Imaging (DI) side, there’s tremendous opportunity as well. That business is focused on the traditional software and scanner business to do document capturing and data capturing. We have licensed software that allows us to migrate from just data capturing. The scanner scans it, the software reads it, knows what it is, and then feeds it to the entire company where the document needs to go. We’re going from data capture to intelligent document management. This is an emerging market and a significant opportunity for the DI business around the world.

 

Document Imaging

Jeff Underwood: What are your plans for future photo scanning products?

RG:We constantly review the needs and desires of our customers. For instance, we just released drivers that allow our Photo Scanning Systems (PS50 and PS80) to be directly driven from popular Mac-based applications. Also, we released new Application Software versions at the end of 2013 for the PS50, PS55, and PS80.
Personalized Imaging

Matt Whitman: There are many, many artists and filmmakers – not just older ones but young, emerging, and mid career – whose work specifically requires the use of film for capturing and/or exhibition images as opposed to a digital means (just as a painter might require oil-based paints rather than water-based paints in order to successful create their work). Do you see film – both motion picture and photographic – as being a sustainable part of Kodak Alaris’ future?

RG: The Motion Picture business is still owned by the Eastman Kodak Company—a company that is separate from Kodak Alaris.

Film Capture is part of Kodak Alaris’ Personalized Imaging business, offering consumers and professionals an award-winning range of still-camera film products. We plan to stay in the film business as long as there’s a profitable market. Film is still in demand. We’re happy to provide it … as long as it makes sense for us. At the moment, it makes sense for us.

 

Heikki Repo: In the past years Kodak was known for somewhat rigid approach to distribution of products here in Europe. In many cases it has been almost impossible for smaller dealers to obtain Kodak products. What is your policy on this? Do you have plans to make it easier for small businesses to cooperate with Kodak Alaris in order to have your pro films more widely available? My question stems partly from a recent experience of a fellow photographer here in Finland who has been interested in taking Kodak Alaris pro films product range to his online store but thus far has been unable to reach anyone to discuss this business opportunity. My best wishes to you and thanks for your excellent products!

RG: Hi, Heikki. Here is contact information for our distributor who covers is Finland. Please connect with them. Thank you.

Andris Dementjevs
Kodak key account manager
Poligrafijas apgads SIA
15 Lejupes street, Riga, LV-1076
Tel: +371 67551833
Mob: +371 26434821
Fax: +371 67551850
e-mail: mailto:andris.dementjevs@polap.lv

 

Timothy Brown: Many of us miss the look and connection to history we felt when taking pictures using Kodak’s old still photography stocks: Kodachrome, Plus-X, etc. Are there any plans to bring some of these older stocks back? Also, the photography community has had something of a back-to-basics moment: Ilford, lomography, and the Impossible Project have all tried to tap into a growing enthusiasm over film photography, classic cameras, and experimental photographic methods. Will Kodak Alaris follow suit and try to (further) integrate itself into the film photography community

RG: The key message to all the film shooters out there is that our full range of photographic films continues to be available. Any decisions we’ve made in the past to drop a particular product were driven by changes in user preferences and/or digital substitution, resulting in substantial fall off in demand.   There is not much point in continuing to make a product that no one is buying in reasonable quantity.   Don’t forget that as we trimmed some of our portfolio, we also continued to optimize many of our films (PORTRA, T-MAX 400) and also added a new one, the very innovative EKTAR 100.

 

“Stone” Robert A Stone III: If Fuji stops producing E6 film, would you consider re-introducing E100G?

RG: The decision to discontinue the manufacture and sale of our EKTACHROME films was a very difficult one. It was based on a steady decrease in demand and customer usage, coupled with a highly complex product formulation and manufacturing process. This conclusion was reached more than two (2) years ago. At this point in time, it would not be practical to try to bring these products back to market.

 

Tom Ribaudo: Can Kodak Alaris sustain color still film production if Hollywood movies are made exclusively digital?

RG:Our award-winning portfolio of consumer and professional films are manufactured in Eastman Kodak’s world-class film factory via a supply agreement. Kodak Alaris remains committed to the film capture business and has the ability to meet the needs of our customers for the foreseeable future

 

William Hogue: Would you consider appointing an official liaison to this group: https://www.flickr.com/groups/ishootfilm/members/ ?

RG: A number of our team members review the forums (APUG, Flickr, etc.) regularly. We respond as often as we can.

 

William Hogue: Do you think it would be possible to downsize production while returning a few products to production, even if only periodically? I am thinking for example of the excellent but under-appreciated ProFotoXL 100 in 135 or 120 format.

RG: Decisions we’ve made in the past to discontinue particular films were driven by changes in user preferences and/or digital substitution, resulting in a substantial fall off in sales.   These discontinued products are more than adequately replaced by the films that Kodak Alaris offers today, which are the very best that Kodak has ever produced.

 

Samuel Davis: Is research and development into new/improved emulsions continuing, or is Kodak Alaris sticking to the emulsions it already has?

RG:Our current product portfolio delivers the very best films available in the world today. In fact, these are the best films that the company has ever produced.   No improvements are necessary.

 

John Mosey: Is there any chance of your company bringing back transparency films such as Ektachrome and black and white films such as Panatomic-X and Plus-X Pan? Thanks in advance for your answer.

RG: The decision to discontinue the manufacture and sale of our EKTACHROME films was a very difficult one. It was based on a steady decrease in demand and customer usage, coupled with a highly complex product formulation and manufacturing process. This conclusion was reached more than two (2) years ago. At this point in time, it would not be practical to try to bring these products back to market.

Many of those older black and white films, in addition to declining sales, were also impacted by changing HSE requirements.   And to be fair, they were more than adequately replaced by the black and white films that Kodak Alaris offers today, which are the very best that the company has ever produced.

Thank you again for your questions. If you missed the opportunity to write to me on LinkedIn, please submit your questions on this blog.

I’m looking forward to Kodak Alaris’ bright future—a future of winning together with our customers, partners, suppliers, and employees.

Ralf

 

In recognition of Earth Day 2014, why is silver recovery relevant?

Today’s Earth Day post comes from three Kodak Alaris Personalized Imaging collaborators…

Rick Welch, Senior Client Service Manager, PI
Dominick Vacco, Customer Technical Support, PI
Beth Rice, Director Environment, Health and Safety, PI

It is relevant to us every day because we are committed to carrying out our business activities in a manner consistent with sound environmental, health and safety management practices and to comply with applicable laws and regulations. We are pleased to be able to assist our customers in meeting their environmental responsibilities by offering the Kodak Silver Recovery Program.

The goal of the Kodak Silver Recovery Program is to put less silver down the drain and more recovered silver profit into your pocket, while giving your business a competitive edge over other businesses that aren’t taking advantage of these services. If you want to conserve resources, prevent pollution, and save money, it simply makes good business and environmental sense to adopt a plan for efficient silver recovery. The program will help you save three of your most valuable resources: silver, time, and money and will offer you a complete range of services that may benefit your business.

Why should we all care about silver management?

If you are among hundreds of thousands of facilities in the United States and Canada that process photographic films and papers, then you are producing silver as a byproduct. The benefits of a silver recovery program far outweigh the effort that you put into it. Efficient silver recovery can be cost effective and profitable even with the high price of silver.

Over the years, Eastman Kodak Company and now Kodak Alaris have offered silver management services to our retail, professional and commercial customers. Our portfolio of services now includes:

  • Consulting Services including: silver assessment program, silver sampling, identifying the right equipment for the lab, and training for your employees
  • The Silver Recovery Program, which offers silver management by the Kodak Alaris network of expert Field Service Engineers in major cities across the USA and Canada

In addition to these services, a program is being developed that will allow our customers to purchase equipment and consumables for their silver recovery program.

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More information on silver recovery management as well as discussion topics can be found in our LinkedIn group site at http://www.linkedin.com/groups?home=&gid=4505432&trk=anet_ug_hm

In honor of Earth Day 2014, remember that an efficient silver management program will:

¨ Preserve our non-renewable resources

¨ Pay for itself when properly configured and maintained

¨ Provide compliance with certain environmental regulations

200 Patents and Counting for Kodak Alaris’ Joe Manico

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Joe Manico (Photo Credit: David B. Goldstein)

At the recent Personalized Imaging Global Town Meeting, Dennis Olbrich recognized one of the Kodak Alaris team members for achieving the milestone of acquiring his 200th United States Patent.  Joe Manico was surprised at the attention he received at the start of the meeting and was quoted as saying, “I had no idea, I’m just glad that I got to the meeting on time”.  Joe joined PI in November of 2012 as a Patent Engineer, but he has had a long history of innovation and intellectual property that started back in 1975.  Since then, Joe has come up with creative inventions and has acquired patents in areas of technology including; digital imaging, film and digital cameras, innovative digital displays, printers, and print finishing systems.

I asked Joe a few questions about being a Patent Engineer…

Manico

Very Early Career: Joe a long time ago starting his career – circa 1975

Q: What is your background, your schooling for instance? How does one become a Patent Engineer?

A: “I have taken a very unconventional path and do not recommend it, to quote my High School Guidance Counselor after she learned that I had won a NYS Regents’ Scholarship, “We never thought you were slow or anything but we never expected this?” I didn’t expect it either. I was more interested in making rockets and models than school, except for the chemistry and physics labs.  I got lucky; over the years I’ve had a lot of different jobs in research and development which exposed me to some brilliant mentors, all kinds of new technologies, and engineering and scientific techniques and procedures.  These experiences provided me many opportunities to solve problems and to be creative.  It helped working in environments where there was more interest in the right solution than the right process or credentials.  I’ve always been drawn to work that involves innovation and creativity, and when that work involves technology that leads to intellectual property.”

"final stage" hydro-pneumatic powered video camera rocket

“final stage” hydro-pneumatic powered video camera rocket

Q: You must constantly be writing on the back of napkins or waking up in the middle of the night with ideas. What best practices do you have for maintaining focus, organization and process?

A: “Yes, many scraps of paper.  It’s critical to always write it down.  In whatever your preferred form, paper or digital, make a sketch, write a few sentences, anything to document the idea, even if at the time sounds funny or seems impractical.  The next step is to refine or expand the original scraps of paper or digital note into a more formal format.  For inventions, a simplified ‘Patent Application’ format works well for me; title, date, a brief abstract, and a few annotated sketches.  For product concepts, I like the ‘Print Ad’ format, which gives you one page to communicate the features and benefits of your idea to a potential customer. What’s nice about these forms of documentation is that they can help convey your ideas to a broader audience and by using these slightly more rigid formats it forces you to really think about your idea and solve potential problems with it or think about alternative approaches.  The same thing goes for a simple print ad; it forces you to think about it.  If you do this enough it becomes a habit.  As far as organization my natural way of thinking is to ‘compartmentalize’.  Everything related to an idea goes in the same labeled mental, hardcopy, and/or digital folder.

Kayak Dog: An attachment Joe made so his dog could go on Kayak rides.

Kayak Dog: An attachment Joe made so his dog could go on Kayak rides.

Q: Do you ever get “inventor’s block”, like “writer’s block”? After 200 patents, how do you keep coming up with fresh ideas?

A: “I wouldn’t call it a block, but sometimes you know there is a better solution that you just haven’t thought of yet.  All patents are solutions to problems.  If you like to think about problems you will have ideas.  The more you focus on a specific problem the more ideas you will have on how to solve it.  It’s about picking right problem to focus on.  The real key for me when managing your own ideas, or problem solutions, is to embrace and discard with the same enthusiasm.  If you are working on a problem, dump an idea as soon as you think of a better one.  It’s hard and counter-intuitive, but don’t get emotionally attached to your ideas.  It will help you have more ideas.”

Joe's now 26 year-old daughter Carley!  in "Action Photo" early prototype (Print from Video)

Joe’s now 26 year-old daughter Carley! in “Action Photo” early prototype (Print from Video)

Q: How does your team support one another in what would seem like a competitive environment?

A: “That’s a great question.  A diverse team can analyze a problem from many different perspectives and provides broader set of potential solutions.  If the team has a mutually agreed upon objective and includes many different disciplines and skills then your chances of success really increase.  We are fortunate to work in an environment where people are more than willing to share their ideas and opinions.  I think people realize that the more we work together the more we all will succeed.”

Joe's home work space and desk

Joe’s home work space and desk – with patent awards hanging on the wall

Q: Why are patents important to a company like Kodak Alaris?

A: “Generally speaking, patents are important to any company involved in innovation that leads to new products and services. Companies need to protect their efforts and investments in research and development and patents provide that protection.”

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Rotor Kite: Home made high wind rotor kite

Q: Do you think you will make it to 300 patents?

A: “Well, if I do I’ll make it to Wikipedia, that’s their prolific inventor threshold.  I don’t really have numeric goals like that; I get satisfaction out of the process.  I like to invent things, file patents, and see inventions in products.  But, just like with cats; they chase things, they kill things, and they eat things but each of these activities provides its own rewards or there would be no multi-billion dollar cat toy industry.  You have to learn that every idea will not become a patent or make it to the market, but you can’t win if you don’t play.”

Homemade "Sea Crocks"

Homemade “Sea Crocks”

Q: If you weren’t a Patent Engineer at Kodak Alaris what do you think you would be doing?

A: “I’m not sure but I think it would involve working on inventions in some form.  I’ve always liked making things, drawing, and writing but my current role provides the resources and opportunities that are very rare to come by so I really appreciate the work and do my best to make the most of it.”

Transformed by Our Response to Racism

I have witnessed racism first hand, both personally and in my professional life.  We know that racism happens throughout the world, but I need neither be a business leader nor a parent of children of color to have been touched and transformed by our response to racism.

Everyone experiences racism in one form or another.  How it impacts us may differ, but to eliminate racism, we must all take a stand – and it starts with awareness.

Kodak’s stand against racism takes place every day.  As our company’s Global Diversity Director, I and Kodak’s senior executives lead our efforts to ensure that our workplaces are free of harassment, and that our employees are treated with dignity, fairness and respect.

The key is that we act to prevent discrimination and harassment in our workplaces.  We do this in several ways:

  • The first of our Kodak Values sets forth an expectation that we treat others with respect for the dignity of the individual.
  • Our senior executives set diversity and inclusion goals for themselves and their operations, and are accountable for meeting those goals.
  • We offer the employee networks representing diverse constituencies at Kodak the opportunity to engage with our senior leaders, and to lead education and awareness-building sessions open to all employees.
  • We require employees to complete an annual review of Kodak’s policies that help enable an engaged, inclusive workforce free of discrimination and harassment.
  • We actively work to develop and sponsor diversity within our global workforce.
  • We reach out and partner with members of our community who share a commitment to ending racism and to build a thriving and diverse environment.

We know that our continued engagement in diversity and inclusion, and against racism, is essential.

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Kodak is one of hundreds of organizations that have raised their hands in support of the YWCA’s mission and vision statement, “The YWCA is dedicated to eliminating racism, empowering women and promoting peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all”.  This statement embodies Kodak values.  In what has become a movement that we observe annually, the

April 26 “Stand Against Racism” observance asks companies, universities, schools, and other organizations to hold an event, private or public, where participants gather to take a pledge to work against racism.  You can learn more about this endeavor at www.standagainstracism.org.

It’s true that we are a society touched and transformed by our response to racism, but racism doesn’t own us.  What it does is challenge us to take a stand and transform our workplaces and communities.  “Be the change you want to see in the world” is a famous quote by Mahatma Gandhi.  So when we encounter racism, confront it, decry it, and take action to prevent its spread.  And, just as importantly, let’s positively promote equality and fairness for all.  Let’s recognize and celebrate our uniqueness and differences and harness this in a way that is beneficial to our employees, customers, organizations and our children.  Let’s foster hope in the hearts of our young and encourage their vision of a world of equality and peace.  They can see it, feel it, and live it.

Celebrate Earth Day with Kodak Adaptive Picture Exchange (APEX)

As Earth Day approaches each year, I like to reflect on things that I have done to improve our environment and make a difference. Did you know that many Kodak products have features and benefits with reduced environmental impact? This year I have been reflecting on the environmental benefits of the KODAK Adaptive Picture Exchange (APEX) and would like to share those benefits with you. The APEX dry lab system uses digital print technology.  This technology eliminates the need to print pictures with water and processing chemicals, which also reduces chemical storage and disposal costs.KODAK_APEX70

In addition, the APEX reduces energy consumption when printing a picture.  By now you are thinking “show me the data”.

The APEX doesn’t need energy to maintain chemistry and paper drying processes.

Energy use was compared to the following representative systems in a retail setting: the KODAK Adaptive Picture Exchange (APEX), NORITSU QSS-2711DLS, FRONTIER 340 Digital Mini Lab, FUJI FRONTIER 570 Digital Mini Lab, and GRETAG Master Lab+ 742.

The electricity required by each system to deliver a standard print volume, 1000 prints per 24-hr period, was measured and used to calculate total energy consumption per a 4 x 6 print. This energy analysis suggested that Kodak’s APEX System consumes 70-90% less energy when compared to traditional photoprocessing minilabs.

The APEX has earned the Kodak Cares logo because of this energy savings comparison.

Greener prints Kodak Cares Logo

The environmental benefits of the APEX do not end with energy savings. Photo paper used to create a print is sourced from PEFC (Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification schemes) certified sources.  This means that each print is created with paper from a sustainably managed forest.

And, one more benefit, the packaging used in the media to create a print is suitable for local recycling and plastic parts are labeled to facilitate proper sorting.

Celebrate Earth Day by printing your pictures, enlargements, collages, and other photo gifts at a retailer that uses the Kodak APEX dry lab. Happy Earth Day!