Film Friday: Ed Thompson & Syrian families on film

Last year, professional media photographer Ed Thompson set out on a mission to photograph Syrian families who had moved to the Lebanese border to escape the atrocities of war in their own country. Ed approached Kodak Alaris as he wanted to use its Portra 120 film on his trip. Kodak Alaris were happy to help and as a result we’re delighted to share with you today, some of the images taken on the shoot – which also have been used in a recent feature on the subject for the BBC news in the UK. We also took the time to chat with Ed about his love of film photography and why he specifically wanted to shoot film.

Here’s what he told us:

?????????????????????????????????????????

When I got into photography it was a pre-digital era, I really got into photography in my 20′s. Now, people forget the magic of photography as it’s so disposable! You know we have the power to stop time?! That’s pretty amazing isn’t it? I’m an odd photojournalist/documentary photographer, I’ve seen things that defy explanation. It has led me to develop a strange agnosticism in an industry filled with atheists.

?????????????????????????????????????????

Using film now is entirely habitual, I confess, I am an addict. Although I shoot both digital and film on assignments when it comes to my own self-initiated projects I prefer to use film. With my old Bronica in my hand I’m a different photographer: 1 in 3 photographs I take make the wide edit that goes to my photo-agencies and the magazines I freelance for. I wonder how many photographers could say the same?

?????????????????????????????????????????

This was a personal project that initially came out of a 1st year student at L.C.C wanting to interview me as a noted Alumni. We went to the pub and he mentioned that there were Syrian refugees in Lebanon where he was from. Within three weeks we were there on the ground working on a project together. If you go to the pub anything can happen.

?????????????????????????????????????????

For this particular photo assignment I wanted to create a powerful and strong portrait series as often in these issues the statistics get so high humanity is unable
to even process the magnitude of its horror. By throwing focus on individual children and their families testimonies, I was creating an important historical document that gave faces to the faceless, voices to the voiceless. And, in my mind it deserves permanence,
hence film.

?????????????????????????????????????????

There’s also a strange faith in using film in this context. I once travelled to a refugee camp in India for only 2 days with 6 rolls of dead stock film – in a way it was pure insanity – but it worked. Of course I could have just used digital, but I believe in my abilities. I believe in them so strongly I don’t even see it as gambling. The hardest part is getting where ever I need to be, once there it is instinct, like breathing. I’m not aware of the process, it’s now entirely habitual.

?????????????????????????????????????????

I was delighted with the outcome of the images and although the BBC would have been aware it was photographed on film, it’s really not that important to a news media titan like the BBC – they took the story because the photographs are tragic, current, important and beautiful all at the same time. I shot on Kodak Portra 120 because it gave me the image results I was looking for.

Film Friday: Talking with Jonathan Canlas

Cruise through Jonathan Canlas’ instagram account, and its clear – his two greatest passions are his adorable family and film photography. Canlas, isn’t just an extremely talented photographer, but he’s also the founder of Film Is Not Dead. He calls Hawaii home but travels the globe conducting his wildly popular FIND Workshops. He’ll head to the UK in February and team with the UK Film Lab to put on one of his two-day workshops. These workshops, in Canlas’ words, are part of a “community, family, a belief, a journey, centered around FIND-ing your unique voice through film photography.” If you’re lucky enough to be in Brighton this February, get your spot http://filmisnotdead.com/#workshopsektar100     We asked Jonathan to share some of the top 5 questions he receives in each workshop. Perhaps some of you have had these questions.

KodakPortra400We’re also lucky enough to have some of Jonathan’s work as well. For more of his work, visit ALOHA.KodakPortra160VC

1. Will shooting film make me a better photographer?

The answer to this is yes and no.

I mean, putting film in your hands is not going to make you see the world differently or make you magically better at your craft.  Meaning if you don’t see light, understand composition, or have a strong voice, film is not going to just give that skill to you.  HOWEVER, when film is put in your hands it forces you to slow down and shoot very differently than if you were shooting digitally.  With a digital camera that has cards that have the capacity to hold thousands upon thousands of images it is easy to just click away, taking multiple captures of one thing.  With no real limitation with digital in how many photos you can take, the discipline to take one and move on is just not needed.  It is really easy to get loose about what you are shooting with that mentality.  However, on film, every time you click it costs money and a certain discipline is usually adapted when shooting film.  With more intention combined with a slower pace, it will literally make you analyze everything that is going in your frame. And this I think can make you a better photographer in the long run.  Where the opposite can make you a sloppy photographer.  It makes you a lot more intentional that is for sure.

Another way it will make you a better photographer is it will force you to learn your exposures.  Obviously, there is no chimping with film.  And to get the perfect negative that requires no time behind a computer requires the perfect exposure.  And if you stick with one ISO for even one full day, you’ll really get to learn really quickly the exposures in different lighting situations.

E100VScrossprocessed

2. What limitations does film have?

Some, but not many.  I still think digital is king in low light situations in terms of shooting in color.  Even if I can underexpose KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA 400 up to 3 stops, it has to be the right light and that light is not always available nor is your subject going to always just be hanging out in that light.  But on the b/w side of things, KODAK PROFESSIONAL TRI-X is incredible.  I’ve seen it pushed to 6400 iso and shot in the darkest of dank receptions and have amazing amazing results.  Other than the low light limitation in terms of color, its abilities outweigh the limitations.  The dynamic range is incredible along with color and most importantly, how images look straight out of camera when scanned by a good lab like the lab I use theFINDlab (http://thefindlab.com).

KodakPortra400VC

3. How can I shoot film and not have it break the bank as digital costs me nothing?

I think the myth needs to be busted that shooting digitally does not “cost” you anything.  First, there is the initial cost of your DSLR, which as time has shown, is usually upgraded every year and some change.  Combine that with the depreciation of your “old” DSLR and you’ve got quite some costs accumulating.  Then there is the “cost” of the time of editing your images.  I don’t know many (any for that matter) that deliver clients images straight out of their camera.  Some time is needed to edit those images and as they say, time is money.  I honestly think that shooting film and shooting digitally the costs are the same.  Either I can shoot film and not have to sit behind a computer or I can “save money” and shoot digitally and then be stuck behind a computer.  Also, touching on the answer of question number 1, when you shoot film, you are not burning through thousands of exposures.  Less editing time and more keepers equals a lot of “money” saved.  Remember, time is money, no matter how you try to rationalize it.

KodakPortra400VC2

4. What is the best film stock to use in multiple lighting situations?

I have found KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA 400 to be the best film for this.  I can effectively have an ISO of 50-3200, without having to change how I develop the roll.  That means I can overexpose up to 3 stops (I’ve even done up to 4 before) and under-expose up to 3 stops all on the same roll without having to pull/push the roll.  The Vision 3 technology in the new PORTRA 400 is absolutely incredible.  Now mind you, you can’t just underexpose PORTRA 400 by 3 stops and think it will look amazing.  You have to find the right light to be able to do this.  Meaning, when you shoot underexposed like this, you need to make sure that whatever you are shooting is lit or has some kind of luminosity to it.  You can’t shoot into a cave with no light and expect it to look ok.  However, if you have some dimly LIT subjects, try underexposing PORTRA 400 and be amazed by the results.

KodakPortra400VC3

5. I know you say FILM IS NOT DEAD but is it close?

No, not at all.  A good friend of mine, Mark Sperry, said something in regards to this recently.  Basically it has never been better for film shooters than it is today.  Even with all of our limitations.  We are missing a TON of different film stocks, camera makers, and labs that used to be around say 10-15 years ago are long gone.  But the ones we do have right now are the best of the best.  We have only a handful of film stocks to choose from but the abilities of said film (the new Kodak Portra line) stocks are amazing.  We only have a couple companies still making film cameras, but we have a HUGE surplus of cameras that people are no longer using and can be snatched up for pennies on the dollar.  And the labs that are open and thriving today (theFINDlab) are labs that are mostly run by film shooters and know how to scan color neg film.  It is a great time to be a film shooter that is for sure.  Arguably the best time.

Film Friday: “Long Live Film” documentary and Indie Film Lab

Last spring, five guys – Luke, Nick, Josh, Alan and Matt – loaded up an RV and set out for Las Vegas from Alabama. This group, better known as the team from Indie Film Lab, took video along the way and what started as a short video has become the documentary, “Long Live Film!”  You can watch previews of “Long Live Film!” here and here on YouTube. The film captures not only their journey across the southern United States, but also their passion for film photography. The guys tell us a bit about their experiences here.

Q. How did you come up with the idea for the documentary?

LUKE LINDGREN: Before our road trip to Las Vegas for WPPI we wanted to document our trip. As we planned out our trip the idea evolved from taking pictures to documenting our trip by making a short video. We wanted our focus to be on film photography, and about why we and other photographers still love film.

But after talking to all the awesome film photographers we met in Vegas there was so much depth and heart in what they had to say. It went from a simple youtube video to a documentary.

Matt - Texasx

JOSH MOATES: It was an organic transition from a road trip to fun blog video to documentary. It definitely was a slow progression and grew very quickly.

Q. What was the most surprising thing you saw while on the road?

MATT ROBBINS: The most surprising thing I saw on the road was the snow for sure. Living in the south my whole life, I had never seen more than a few inches of snow. The first time I saw more than a foot of snow while we were on the road I was literally like a kid in a candy store. I just wanted to run up and play in the snow. I was pretty pumped to see snow that was up to my knees.

ALAN EVANS: The antics of (professional photographers) Ryan Muirhead and Tanja Lippert; How awesome everyone was at Joshua Tree.

8170002705-R1-E005x

NICK DROLLETTE: The most surprising thing I saw on the road was how big our country was. I have done a good bit of traveling up the east coast and I have also been to Haiti and Cuba but I have never been out west in our own country. I was really shocked to see what was out there. The landscape and the terrain were absolutely beautiful. I have never seen any rock formations like they have out there. It was really nice to get out of Alabama and see a change of scenery.

000001100003x

Q. What was your favorite location?

JOSH: The Grand Canyon.

Screen Shot 2013-10-29 at 10.13.49 AMx

ALAN: The Grand Canyon, however the company I was around during the trip would have made any place awesome.

MATT: While we were driving to the Grand Canyon, we would see cracks in the ground while driving through Texas and Arizona. I was getting excited about seeing a few that were 10-20 feet deep. Then we got to the Grand Canyon and I was just astounded by its size. It was my favorite location on the trip by far.

000080300011x

NICK: When I was photographing Monument Valley, I started walking down into the valley just shooting away and after about 30 minutes of shooting I realized I was close to a mile away from the RV. It was just an overwhelming experience that I had to capture.

LUKE:  Joshua Tree, CA was awesome because there were about 20+ film loving photographers just hanging out, shooting film, and learning from each other out in the California desert.

Q. What films did you bring and how did you shoot them?

LUKE: KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA 400 @ 200, KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA 160 @ 100 or 80, KODAK PROFESSIONAL TRI-X @ anything from 200-1600 and KODAK PROFESSIONAL EKTAR 100 @ 100. Both 35mm and 120/220.

5555002168-R1-E013x

ALAN: All KODAK PROFESSIONAL Film: PORTRA 160, 400 and 800; EKTAR 100; KODAK PROFESSIONAL BW400CN; TRI-X

JOSH: We had every type of KODAK PROFESSIONAL Film you can imagine. But I shot TRI-X and PORTRA 160 most of the time.

Screen Shot 2013-10-29 at 10.20.03 AMx

MATT: The films that I brought on the trip were EKTAR 100, PORTRA 160 and 400, and Tri-X 400. I wanted a bright look, but with the highlights still there so I was shooting all my film at slightly lower speeds than the box speed. I shot a few rolls of EKTAR 100 at 80, PORTRA 160 at 100, and most of the PORTRA 400 at 200.

NICK: I shot mostly with PORTRA 160 and 400. I did shoot a bunch of TRI-X though. I have shot Tri-x a few times before but nothing like I did on the road trip. Tri-x 35mm and 120 are simply stunning. They just give a look that digital can’t give you. I also fell in love with a film that I was not familiar with at all. EKTAR 100 was such a cool film to shoot with. I shot some of my landscapes with EKTAR 100 and I am super happy that I did. One of the places I shot EKTAR 100 with was the Grand Canyon. The colors that I got back from it were pretty awesome. I was super happy with them when I started scanning them in.

000001020001x

Q. What do you hope that people take away from this documentary?

LUKE: Our greatest hope is that people see shooting film as more than just the look, and they begin to understand the feel film gives you. There’s a lot of beauty in film, and this documentary explains it all. It’s the entire process that can really take your art to a new place.

ALAN: Do what you love to do!

8161002569-R1-037-17x

JOSH: I hope photographers that started with digital will see how amazing, expressive and rewarding film can be

MATT: I hope people can really understand what film is all about, and that it isn’t about shooting 2000 images at a wedding and not using 1800 or just bracketing one shot to make sure you get the right exposure. It is an art form and you really have to know what you are doing and time your shots just right. When you get to the point of having a 80% return rate on the shots you take with film, and it seems like every shot you take is awesome, that’s when film becomes an addiction. When you shoot 15 rolls of 120 and get back 195 or 200 images that are  awesome, that is a great feeling.

000080180005x

NICK: I hope that people take away from the documentary that film is not dead. I don’t want people to think that we are trying to push that film is better than digital. They both have their uses and I encourage people to shoot what they want. Whether it is an iPhone, disposable camera or a Hassleblad, shoot what inspires you. I just hope that it educates new photographers and helps them understand the roots of photography. I think that if people understood film that they would have more of appreciation for photography. I know for me personally film has changed the way I shoot and it has brought more of an excitement to it.

Check out “Long Live Film!” on the Indie Film Lab YouTube Channel, available today.

In addition, you can see the team’s journey on Instagram, Facebook and on Twitter.

Click here to find more information on Indie Film Lab online.

Film Friday: An Interview with Ryan Muirhead

This Sunday, the final episode of FILM! will air, bringing to a close another season filled with not just beautiful photographs, but also with emotions, insights and advice from some wildly talented photographers.  We got to spend some time with Ryan Muirhead, one of the original hosts of the series, who we were fortunate enough to meet a few years ago. One of the things we’ve admired so much about Ryan, beyond his gift for photography, is his willingness to share, teach and inspire others with his work.

Q: What camera and equipment do you use?

A: I shoot with a Leica M7, a Pentax 67ii, a Pentax 67, a Nikon fe2 and a Contax T2. I love trying everything.

blog_RyanMuirhead_01_800

Q: What are you trying to achieve with your photography?

A: I have always wanted it to feel like song lyrics — relatable yet unspecific. I really don’t know what I am trying to achieve yet, right now I just want to make beautiful, meaningful images and share my passion for film and photography.

Q: When did you first discover your passion for photography?

A: My father was a camera operator on movies and TV shows as I was growing up. I worked for a few years as a camera assistant in Utah and California, but never in a creative capacity. I took my first creative picture ever in 2006 on the set of a movie during lunch. About a month after that photography was consuming all of my free time.

Q: How did you first become interested in KODAK Film?

A: I enrolled in a class about shooting film in school kind of out of the blue. The teacher was adamant that everyone should be shooting Fuji but I had grown up using and loading KODAK Film on movies and I loved the look. A few years ago, I met reps from Kodak Alaris, who gave me some KODAK Film to start using. A few months later my images were used for the ad campaigns for the new Portra 400 and 160 films. I now shoot almost exclusively KODAK Films with a few very low speed or very high-speed exceptions. I have also been using KODAK 500T movie film in my still cameras.

Q: How do you have your film developed and scanned?

A: I currently use Indie Film Lab in Montgomery, Alabama for all of my color and black and white film scanning/developing.

Q: What approach do you take with your photography or what does photography mean to you?

A: I try to shoot as much as I can. I think it’s the only way to have a personal style. To shoot so often and in enough varied circumstances so that your style has a chance to find you. I have very documentary tendencies. Even in the shoots I am staging or directing I still try to wait and capture how people move or stand naturally.

blog_RyanMuirhead_02_800

Q: That’s a very intriguing comment. Can you say something more about how that process of self-discovery seems to be working out for you?

A: I have been thinking about this a lot lately. Photography is so dependent on science that there seems to be two different halves to the experience, the gear side and the expressive side. So much is said back and forth about how much the gear you are using matters and it is, of course, all-important and not at all important. If we didn’t have cameras we would make no pictures, but when we worry exclusively about what our gear can do we lose what we are bringing to the table.

This is the most attractive element of film and Leica to me. I load the camera with a specific film type and then I can set my aperture and shutter speed and that is it. Everything else that comes to the image must come from me. I love forcing myself into that minimalism so that what I am feeling has the best chance to incorporate itself into the image. Finding that this was the best way for me to shoot was not always clear to me. None of us begin shooting knowing what the best way for us to express ourselves will be. I think that is the greatest drawback to the DSLR revolution. Millions of unique and nuanced artists are shooting on the exact same camera with the same three zoom lenses. Many of them produce amazing work, but I wonder how their vision might change if they picked up a field camera, a TLR, a rangefinder, a Polaroid camera. Filmʼs greatest strength seems to be that there are so many ways of arriving at an image.

Q:  As a photographer who came of age in the digital era, what particularly attracted you to film and why do you shoot it exclusively? What color films do you like? How about black-and-white?

A: I love film both for the look of it and for how it makes me shoot. Portraits are all about connection with the subject and I find all the menu items, buttons and, of course, the screen to be a distraction. I like everything stripped down: minimal lighting, simple settings, honest moments. I want this to apply to my cameras too — an aperture setting and a shutter speed setting is enough for me. As far as color negative films go, my favorites are KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA 160 and 800 Films. The new PORTRA films are styled after the Kodak cinema films that I grew up around. I love the latitude, the fine grain, the performance under mixed light, everything. Lately I have re-fallen-in-love with KODAK PROFESSIONAL TRI-X Film. It’s just so perfectly classic. If I could only shoot one film for the rest of my life it would be TRI-X without a doubt.

blog_RyanMuirhead_03_800

Q: Several of your images can be described as fashion portraits. What has drawn you to that genre which you say youʼve “never felt a part of” and what is motivating you to explore documentary photography?

A: I really struggle to place myself within a genre. I shoot a lot of models and work with a lot of stylists, but I have never felt my work really fit into the fashion or editorial genres. Fashion photography is inherently about the clothes and my work is inherently about the face. Everything I love about photography is in capturing the human face. It is endlessly diverse and expressive. I love the challenge that documentary photography presents. One of my favorite ways to practice or learn is to limit the amount of control I have. To shoot one camera, or one film, or one lens; to try and take away all the options we are constantly presented with and make my mind the only variable. With documentary photography you traditionally have very little control over many of the elements and you really have to assert yourself to make it your photograph.

Q: How do you think the courses in your photography program have influenced your work? Have you been exposed to any photographic work that you see as a source of inspiration?

A: School has been a blessing and a curse to me. I love the exposure to other artists and professors and how it forces you to work, but I have never performed well in a structured environment. I was constantly shooting what I wanted and trying to bend the assignments to fit what I was going to shoot anyway. One of the best things about school was being exposed to the work of the masters. Seeing and studying Avedonʼs “In the American West” has been the single most influential moment of my photographic life. It embodied everything I wanted my work to be.

blog_RyanMuirhead_04_800

Q: You stated that you shoot “people almost exclusively.” What is it about photographing people that you find especially compelling and satisfying? Do you think that the discipline of shooting abstract compositions, nature subjects, scenic vistas, etc. can be helpful in developing techniques for shooting better people pictures?

A: The human form and more specifically the human face is the ultimate subject.

Hamlet put it best:

“What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason, how infinite in faculties, in form and moving how express and admirable, in action how like an angel, in apprehension how like a god! The beauty of the world…” I am constantly and consistently drawn to the face. I love the connection that happens when I try to express something I am feeling via another person. The connection and validation experienced at its most successful is unsurpassed.

Q: How do you see your photography evolving in the immediate future and over the next few years?

A: I am hoping to do more documentary and large format work in the coming months. I also hope to rededicate myself to taking even more pictures of my friends and family, as they are the most important part of my life. Above all I want my work to be personal.

You follow Ryan Muirhead on Twitter (@rnmphotography), Instagram (@ryanmuirhead)  and Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/ryanmuirheadphotography

Sharing Our Images – post from Reid Callanan

“We’ve enjoyed a long relationship with the Santa Fe Workshop, led by Reid Callanan and we’re thrilled to have a blog post from him today. Reid’s passion for photography is matched only by his desire to help others become better at it. In addition to the many workshops his organization runs, he runs Photo Teens, which introduces young adults to the world of photography. Reid tells us a bit more about the program, and why film is an important part of that  workshop.” – Audrey

**************************************

When I was a young man (40 years ago) I grew up in a photographic world of film and black-and-white prints made in a darkroom. I learned the craft of photography getting my hands wet. Fast forward to 2013, and today’s youth are growing up in photographic universe almost completely unrecognizable from a technology standpoint. Their world of pictures is a digital one using cell phones to post their pictures to Facebook and Instagram. What a world of difference in a few short years!

At the same time, young adults who work with film are continually amazed by the experience and results, and react to photography created with film much differently from that created via digital. As director of the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops, I believe in getting teens excited about photography by watching an image rise and take form in a tray of developer and sharing the resulting print with their friends face-to-face. For this very reason, we teach our Photo Teens summer workshop program using film and printing paper. These silver-halide materials and the uniquely magical process in the darkroom excites and inspires these teen’s creativity and self expression unlike anything in their digital domain. This traditional photographic start opens an entirely new world for their dreams and visions.

Kodak Alaris has been a long-time supporter of our Photo Teens workshops over the past ten years and their materials have enabled our teens’ photographic vision to come to light. Here are a few images made by the participants in this summer’s Photo Teens workshop here in Santa Fe:

Michelle La Sage Ryan Williamson Sharing images is at the core of being a photographer, whether making silver prints or digital images. One fun and rewarding way to share our images is entering photography contests. Entering contests affords us an opportunity to evaluate our images and choose our best work. Then we get to see if our best work is considered by the contest judges to be the best work submitted. Being recognized and acknowledged for our best work is a rewarding experience for any photographer. And if we are so honored, we get to share our best work around the world. And the prizes are nice too.

AlmaValdezGarcia AlmaValdezGarcia2 Sarah_Surprise

Our upcoming photo contest from the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops is themed BACKYARD and will run from September 19 through November 19. Kodak Alaris has generously provided professional film as prizes for all four major contest winners, and we have provided free workshops, and many other photographic companies have provided prizes as well. Check out the details for BACKYARD here http://www.santafeworkshops.com/contest/.

Reid Callanan Director,
Santa Fe Photographic Workshops

Kinfolk Magazine and Kodak Film

Nothing would be more tiresome than eating and drinking if God had not made them a pleasure as well as a necessity.  ~Voltaire  85250016-45

As the temperatures rise and life slows down, friends and families gather around pools, picnic tables, campfires, outdoor cafes and roof top decks to share good meals and a cold drink. Some people will stay in town. Others will hit the open road. Some will follow time honored summer traditions while others strike out in search of new adventures.

006653-R1-007

Kinfolk Magazine embodies all of these things. It’s more a keepsake coffee book than a magazine. Each issue includes, as the publisher aptly describes it “lush photography, lyrical essays, recipes, interviews, profiles, personal stories and practical tips along with a keen attention to design and details.” Woven among all of this are the themes of discovering, making and doing new things.

80510030_v1-11

We are honored that Kinfolk makes KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA 160 and 400 an integral part of the creation of such a simply beautiful publication.  Its pages and website include work from a roster of talented photographers, like Parker Fitzgerald, Tec Petaja, Leo Patrone, Jay Fitzgerald, Laura Dart and Carissa Gallo.

We first learned about Kinfolk last fall when we met Parker Fitzgerald. He asked “Might Kodak have any interest in working with this magazine, Kinfolk?” After reviewing just a few images, we were hooked. Our film, put in the hands of these photographers, could only result in beautiful images. Each of their photographs inspires – a recipe to make, a gathering to host, a culture to experience, a memory to create.

We invite you to grab a copy, visit the website and find your own inspiration this summer.

Kinfolk is a quarterly, 144-page, ad-free print magazine.  In addition to the print edition, Kinfolk recently launched Kinfolk Digital.

You can follow Kinfolk on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/kinfolkmag), on Twitter (@kinfolkmag) and Instagram (@Kinfolkmag). 

A Celebration of Film

As the director of World Wide Photographer Relationships, my job has so many cool aspects. One of the best?  The world renowned photographers with whom we have unbelievable relationships, like Steve McCurry, John Sexton, Joyce Tenneson, Matthew Jordan Smith and Mary Ellen Mark and emerging photographers, like the ones we get to meet through groups like The Society for Photographic Education, PDN 30, and the [F] Network. We hope that their work will inspire you – to grab your camera, try a new film, shoot a new subject. And what better time than next week’s World Film Day. On April 12, the team from Lomography will host events, including a series of Meet-Ups, around the globe to celebrate all things analogue.

Meanwhile, in the coming weeks and months here on Film Fridays, we’ll give you a chance to hear from some of these mind-blowingly talented men and women who take our films and create those photographs that make you smile, laugh, cry, think, remember and dream.

First up – Eliot Dudik. We first met Dudik as part of the 2010 PDN Emerging Photographers. Based in Charleston, SC, Dudik shoots large format, using cameras like a Korona View Camera. His monograph, ROAD ENDS IN WATER, first published in 2010, celebrates the culture and landscape of rural South Carolina, specifically between Savannah and Charleston.

Battle of Aiken 150th

Battle of Aiken 150th

Battle of Allatoona Pass

Battle of Allatoona Pass

Battle of Antietam

Battle of Antietam

Battle of Bull Run

Battle of Bull Run

Battle of Congaree Creek

Battle of Congaree Creek

Battle of Kennesaw Mountain

Battle of Kennesaw Mountain

Battle of Monocacy

Battle of Monocacy

Battle of South Mountain at Foxs Gap

Battle of South Mountain at Foxs Gap

Battle of Stones River at McFaddens Ford

Battle of Stones River at McFaddens Ford

We loved it when he shared this video, produced by Virginia Cinema Films, showing some behind the scenes work on his current project, shooting Civil War re-enactments, using 8×10 PORTRA 160. Enjoy!

Introducing Wednesday Works – Laura Quatela

QuatelaHeadshot

Welcome to Kodak’s Personalized Imaging “Wednesday Works” Blog!  Every Wednesday, we’ll feature business topics relevant to our customers in the retail, wholesale, and professional photography markets.

Here is an introduction by Laura Quatela….

I have the privilege of managing Personalized Imaging, which is comprised of our Film Capture, Paper & Output Systems, Retail Systems Solutions, and Event Imaging Solutions businesses (together, “PI”).  As many of you know, in August 2012 Kodak announced that it was initiating a sale process for these businesses.  We are moving full-steam through this process, and are confident that PI will be under new ownership by the middle of this year.

In 2012, Personalized Imaging sustained a consistent record of profitability.  We introduced market-leading products and services, entered new partnerships across multiple regions, and renewed agreements with some of the world’s largest retailers and professional labs.  Of course we continue to engage with talented and inspiring professional photographers around the globe, who use Kodak Professional films to create thought-provoking, visually stunning bodies of work.  All of these interactions reflect an ongoing commitment to PI by our customers, suppliers, and partners.

On a personal note, I want to underscore my pride in the ongoing efforts of our PI teams around the world to maintain the high standard of service that is essential to our customers and yours.  We have hundreds of staff members in development, manufacturing, sales, marketing, customer service, technical support, and other core functions.  These experienced, talented, and committed employees are passionate about meeting your needs, and driving a bright future for PI.

We look forward to engaging with you every Wednesday about the issues that impact you and your businesses.  Thanks for reading!

NOTE: This post was up previously but due to problems to the old blog platform we have had to repost it this week.