Mother’s Day is on the Way

Mother’s Day is less than 2 weeks away so it’s time to start planning. With the KODAK Picture Kiosk and the My KODAK MOMENTS App it’s easy even if you wait until the last minute for customized greeting cards and gifts. Same day service is not a problem for our products. Use your smartphone to create a card, order prints or make a photo book that you can pick up on your way home from work.

If you need some inspiration we have a whole Tips & Project Center full of great ideas to get you started.

Here are some ideas for a cute card from the kids.

Screen shot 2014-04-28 at 11.04.30 AM

Spell It Out: For a unique way to send Mother’s Day greetings, have the kids write the message on their feet. (Bonus: Picture the look on the kids’ faces when you ask them to take off their socks and write on their feet!).

And for those of you with furry children:

Card from Your Pet

Screen shot 2014-04-28 at 11.04.07 AM

And you can save a pretty penny on these personalized cards–from now until May 11th all KODAK Personalized Greeting Cards are Buy One, Get One Free. Check out the promotion.

We also have ideas for photo books and collages that will melt Mom’s heart.

I Love You Book: This photo book is sure to become a treasured keepsake. Take pictures of the kids holding signs saying why they love Mom, such as, “I love you because you bake cookies with me” or “I love you because you do crafts with me.” Page after page highlights all the reasons the kids love Mom.

Screen shot 2014-04-28 at 11.05.03 AM

Here’s an idea for a photo book for adult children to give their Mom. Recreate childhood scenes and put the photos side-by-side in a Now and Then Photo Book.

Screen shot 2014-04-28 at 11.05.36 AM

Family Collage: A collage featuring pictures of the whole family, as well as individual pictures of Mom & Dad with each child makes a great Mother’s Day gift.

Screen shot 2014-04-28 at 11.06.39 AM

If you’d like to get the kids involved in a project that’s sure to leave a lasting impression on Mom, the time to start is now! We’ve rounded up a bunch of ideas to get you and the kiddos started on projects that go beyond the clichéd macaroni necklace but are still simple enough to be done in minutes.

Here’s a great one for the littlest kids. They will love getting messy with the paint or inkpad when making the Handprint Photo Matte:

Screen shot 2014-04-28 at 11.07.26 AM

For something a little more complex, maybe for older children and teens to work on, check out this Photo Star Project:

Screen shot 2014-04-28 at 11.08.02 AM

For those of you with kids that love to glue and decoupage, how about a pretty Photo Flower Pot for Mom?

Screen shot 2014-04-28 at 11.07.03 AM

This is just a start—check out these and other great Mom’s Day projects on our Tips & Projects Center.

And we’re don’t forget about the Buy one, Get one FREE promotion on our Mother’s Day cards to go along with any of these personalized gifts you make!

Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day – Herschel Pollard

Today’s blog post for World Pinhole Photography Day comes from guest blogger Herschel Pollard.

*******************************

I began shooting pinhole about 10 years ago when a friend convinced me to build a camera out of foam core and an old Polaroid back. My first image was a 15-minute exposure in my living room on Type 55 film…and it wasn’t very good. The camera needed adjustment. I needed adjustment. But I got hooked. By the time I finished that box of film I’d managed to adjust the camera, and my thinking, well enough to produce amazingly sharp images. I felt chills every time a photo worked, like witnessing magic.

Image

Yellow Dress, Expired Portra 100T

I love pinhole because it requires long exposures, even on bright days, which means movement disappears. I love pinhole because there is infinite depth of field so everything is in focus. I love pinhole because when the focal length is short enough you get vignette and stretchy goodness at the edges. I love pinhole because it challenges me.[/caption]

Image

Apollo Lands, Portra 160

Most professional photographers shoot pinhole at least once, usually in some high school or college class, a lesson in the most basic form of photography using the most basic form of camera. Honestly, cameras don’t get any simpler than pinhole. No battery, no viewfinder, no glass, no focus, no auto anything, just a box with a tiny hole and some film.

Image

Dawn Through a Dirty Window On a Red Eye Train, Expired Portra 160

Behind this simplicity, though, is a learning curve that can be frustrating … maddening, really, when you consider variables different films throw into the mix, like reciprocity failure and long exposure color shift (Portra has a beautiful blue shift). That learning curve is why pinholers are some of the most serious and knowledgeable photographers I’ve met. Pinhole certainly improved my photographic skills.

Image

Pinholing Yosemite, Portra 400VC

My go-to camera is a 6×9 medium format Zero Image, made by Zernike Au in Hong Kong. It’s a teak (sustainably farmed) and brass beauty with an aperture of f/235 and considered by many the Leica of pinhole cameras. He also makes 4×5 and 35mm versions.  Other cameras I shoot: Nikkormat FTN 35mm with a pinhole body cap I made; a Holga 120 WPC, which shoots 6×12 on medium format film; a homemade camera that shoots Impossible Project instant film; Zeiss Ikon Nettar 518 converted to pinhole; several others I’ve built.

Image

Traffic Circle, Portra 400

A common theme among my cameras is that they all shoot film…mostly 120.  I find that film works better for pinhole, although I’m not sure why. Perhaps it’s just personal preference (although I’ve found most of my peers agree). I created a body cap pinhole for my Nikon DSLR and found the images were…well…weak is the best description.

Image

David, Portra 160 

I find 120 format Portra 160 gives the most reliable results, has a good contrast, and as I mentioned before, there’s a nice blue shift in long exposures. Also, reciprocity failure (the need to add more time to an exposure the longer you exposure the film) isn’t as steep with Portra as it is with most films. And it scans really well.

Image

Pitted Confusion, Portra 160

Every year, on the last Sunday of April, there is an international event to celebrate pinhole: Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day. The idea is that photographers from around the world shoot pinholes on a single day and submit them to the group website (http://www.pinholeday.org/). This year’s event is April 27. To help new pinhole photographers get started, Pinhole Day-related workshops are offered in numerous cities across the globe. Most cover the process of building a pinhole camera and creating your first images. It’s a great place to start.

Image

7-Hour Lunargraph, Portra 160

There are numerous pinhole resources. The definitive pinhole book is Eric Renner’s Pinhole Photography. Renner, considered a pioneer of modern pinhole photography, knows how to break the subject into easy-to-digest chunks, although it can get a bit technical for folks who don’t know photography well.

Two less technical books I’ve read that cover the subject well are Pinhole Cameras: A DIY Guide, by Chris Keeney and The Pinhole Camera: A Practical How-To Book for Making Pinhole Cameras and Images, by Brian Krummel.

Check out F295.org, a forum and blog site dedicated to “Historic, Alternative and Digital Techniques.” It has tens of thousands of posts related to lensless photography, with a dedicated core group of users who welcome and assist people just starting out in pinhole. It’s where my pinhole network began.

If you want to build pinhole cameras then Pinhole.cz and MrPinhole.com provide online calculators for proper camera and pinhole sizes. And don’t forget Kodak’s own, “How to Make and Use a Pinhole Camera.” There are plenty of other resources out there – just search for “pinhole photography” and see what you find.

If that isn’t enough, I’m lucky enough to be part of the recently started “Pinhole Podcast,” on the pdexposures network — along with Jana Obscura, Shelly Sometimes, Alex Yates, and Jeff Soderquist — where we discuss all things pinhole. Recent episodes covered the differences between paper, film, and digital (humorous and engaging, I swear), and interviews with world-renowned pinholers visiting Berlin for the OBSCURA pinhole exhibit.

Finally, you can find me at SquarePegPinhole.com. It’s where I post most of my work, write about pinhole photography and share my experiences. I’m always happy to answer questions about pinhole.

 

 

In recognition of Earth Day 2014, why is silver recovery relevant?

Today’s Earth Day post comes from three Kodak Alaris Personalized Imaging collaborators…

Rick Welch, Senior Client Service Manager, PI
Dominick Vacco, Customer Technical Support, PI
Beth Rice, Director Environment, Health and Safety, PI

It is relevant to us every day because we are committed to carrying out our business activities in a manner consistent with sound environmental, health and safety management practices and to comply with applicable laws and regulations. We are pleased to be able to assist our customers in meeting their environmental responsibilities by offering the Kodak Silver Recovery Program.

The goal of the Kodak Silver Recovery Program is to put less silver down the drain and more recovered silver profit into your pocket, while giving your business a competitive edge over other businesses that aren’t taking advantage of these services. If you want to conserve resources, prevent pollution, and save money, it simply makes good business and environmental sense to adopt a plan for efficient silver recovery. The program will help you save three of your most valuable resources: silver, time, and money and will offer you a complete range of services that may benefit your business.

Why should we all care about silver management?

If you are among hundreds of thousands of facilities in the United States and Canada that process photographic films and papers, then you are producing silver as a byproduct. The benefits of a silver recovery program far outweigh the effort that you put into it. Efficient silver recovery can be cost effective and profitable even with the high price of silver.

Over the years, Eastman Kodak Company and now Kodak Alaris have offered silver management services to our retail, professional and commercial customers. Our portfolio of services now includes:

  • Consulting Services including: silver assessment program, silver sampling, identifying the right equipment for the lab, and training for your employees
  • The Silver Recovery Program, which offers silver management by the Kodak Alaris network of expert Field Service Engineers in major cities across the USA and Canada

In addition to these services, a program is being developed that will allow our customers to purchase equipment and consumables for their silver recovery program.

Screen Shot 2014-04-21 at 4.33.49 PM

More information on silver recovery management as well as discussion topics can be found in our LinkedIn group site at http://www.linkedin.com/groups?home=&gid=4505432&trk=anet_ug_hm

In honor of Earth Day 2014, remember that an efficient silver management program will:

¨ Preserve our non-renewable resources

¨ Pay for itself when properly configured and maintained

¨ Provide compliance with certain environmental regulations

The Importance of Mentors – By Guest Blogger Elisa Bricker

Creating a photograph is exhilarating. There is power in the creative arts, and the ability to compose, manipulate, and work with a subject is a cultivated skill, one that continually gives me joy and makes me happy to be a photographer.

I remember learning to shoot film from my grandfather and father using a hand-me-down 35mm film camera. After shooting the rolls I had purchased at a nearby store, and impatiently waiting for them to be developed by a local lab, I would sit down for one on one critique with each of them. We would talk about lighting, composition, metering and so on. Those hours spent in mentoring were invaluable to me, and fueled my desire to learn more and do better.

Shot on KODAK PORTRA 400

Shot on KODAK PORTRA 400

When I began shooting professionally, I purchased a digital camera. I soon realized that I was spending endless hours at my desk editing my digital images and trying to make them look like film. But why make them look like film when it’s better to use film itself!

Shot on KODAK PORTRA 400

Shot on KODAK PORTRA 400

In this digital age, I’m flattered when others see and appreciate what I do with film. I see in both previous and current generations – people valuing the artistic process and the medium I use to create images for them.

Shot on KODAK PORTRA 400

Shot on KODAK PORTRA 400

While I am a hybrid shooter (using both digital and film), my first instinct is to choose film, whether I’m shooting personal work or professionally. I absolutely love photographing my subjects using film. I love the process of using it – of thinking more deliberately, and taking time to create. Film helps me to slow down and really see the world around me.

20130820_Charleston_097_Elisa_Bricker

Shot on KODAK PORTRA 400

That’s where having my grandfather and father as mentors made all the difference. Learning film on your own can be a daunting experience.

Because I love film – especially KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA 400 – I want others to fall in love with it as well. My husband Edward (the owner of Contax Rental) and I created a film workshop in partnership with Belle Lumiere Magazine because we recognized the draw that film creates and how intimidating it can be to try shooting film without training.

We want to give photographers who are new to film an outlet to experience, ask questions and master the basics. We’ve set out to encourage photographers to get excited about film, learn how to choose the best equipment – film, camera, light meter and lab – and then guide them to use these tools of the trade to their benefit.

Holding a camera in our hands is all about learning and seeing. If we can open people up to seeing that larger world, we might just empower a whole new generation of film mentors.

For more information about our upcoming workshop in Nashville, Tennessee visit: http://www.bellelumieremagazine.com/bloomsbury-farm/

Shot on KODAK PORTRA 400

Elisa Bricker – Photo by Eric Kelley http://www.erickelleyphotography.com/

Elisa Bricker is a film-based wedding and portrait photographer who lives in Charlottesville, Virginia. Her work has been featured in Martha Stewart Weddings, Once Wed, Southern Weddings Magazine, Southern Living Weddings Magazine, Weddings Unveiled Magazine, The Knot, Style Me Pretty, & More.

When Elisa is not photographing weddings, she is traveling and photographing her surroundings for pleasure, spending time with her husband Edward, their son, and their little pup who loves to curl up at her feet while she reads.

Film Friday: Ed Thompson & Syrian families on film

Last year, professional media photographer Ed Thompson set out on a mission to photograph Syrian families who had moved to the Lebanese border to escape the atrocities of war in their own country. Ed approached Kodak Alaris as he wanted to use its Portra 120 film on his trip. Kodak Alaris were happy to help and as a result we’re delighted to share with you today, some of the images taken on the shoot – which also have been used in a recent feature on the subject for the BBC news in the UK. We also took the time to chat with Ed about his love of film photography and why he specifically wanted to shoot film.

Here’s what he told us:

?????????????????????????????????????????

When I got into photography it was a pre-digital era, I really got into photography in my 20’s. Now, people forget the magic of photography as it’s so disposable! You know we have the power to stop time?! That’s pretty amazing isn’t it? I’m an odd photojournalist/documentary photographer, I’ve seen things that defy explanation. It has led me to develop a strange agnosticism in an industry filled with atheists.

?????????????????????????????????????????

Using film now is entirely habitual, I confess, I am an addict. Although I shoot both digital and film on assignments when it comes to my own self-initiated projects I prefer to use film. With my old Bronica in my hand I’m a different photographer: 1 in 3 photographs I take make the wide edit that goes to my photo-agencies and the magazines I freelance for. I wonder how many photographers could say the same?

?????????????????????????????????????????

This was a personal project that initially came out of a 1st year student at L.C.C wanting to interview me as a noted Alumni. We went to the pub and he mentioned that there were Syrian refugees in Lebanon where he was from. Within three weeks we were there on the ground working on a project together. If you go to the pub anything can happen.

?????????????????????????????????????????

For this particular photo assignment I wanted to create a powerful and strong portrait series as often in these issues the statistics get so high humanity is unable
to even process the magnitude of its horror. By throwing focus on individual children and their families testimonies, I was creating an important historical document that gave faces to the faceless, voices to the voiceless. And, in my mind it deserves permanence,
hence film.

?????????????????????????????????????????

There’s also a strange faith in using film in this context. I once travelled to a refugee camp in India for only 2 days with 6 rolls of dead stock film – in a way it was pure insanity – but it worked. Of course I could have just used digital, but I believe in my abilities. I believe in them so strongly I don’t even see it as gambling. The hardest part is getting where ever I need to be, once there it is instinct, like breathing. I’m not aware of the process, it’s now entirely habitual.

?????????????????????????????????????????

I was delighted with the outcome of the images and although the BBC would have been aware it was photographed on film, it’s really not that important to a news media titan like the BBC – they took the story because the photographs are tragic, current, important and beautiful all at the same time. I shot on Kodak Portra 120 because it gave me the image results I was looking for.

A future of winning together – Ralf Gerbershagen, CEO, Kodak Alaris

This is an exciting week for me as I begin my new responsibilities. I am honored to lead a billion-dollar startup company that has so much growth opportunity. Kodak Alaris’ great customer profile, strong teams, profitable products and solutions, and fresh start make it an incredible company.

To our customers, thank you for trusting Kodak Alaris with your business. Your loyalty means everything to us. It fuels success for both your business and ours, and we look forward to engaging with you more.

For some background about me, my passions include driving long-term growth by way of innovation, empowerment, and accountability. And those passions are behind everything I want to do for Kodak Alaris and our customers to enable success for all.

During the next few months, I will begin travelling to meet with customers, partners, distributors, suppliers, and employees. I welcome your questions and comments, so please write to me at ceo@kodakalaris.com if you would like to connect. I value open and honest communication.

We have much to be proud of during our seven months as Kodak Alaris and, at the same time, much to accomplish. I’m excited about our future of winning together. Thank you for your ongoing support. We are honored to work with you now and for many years to come.

Ralf

The new Kodak Moments HD App for your tablet!

I love my iPad. I find myself using it over my laptop more and more, whether it’s looking up recipes in the kitchen or checking IMDB while watching a movie in the living room. After a look at the statistics, I don’t think I’m alone. By 2015 there will be 82.1 million tablet users in the United States. The average tablet user spends 90 minutes a day on their tablet. 80% of tablet users say it has improved their work/life balance and ummm 35% of people say they have used their tablet in the bathroom!

blog-600

It only makes sense that you should be able to make photo books and order prints on your tablet too! Today Kodak Alaris introduces KODAK MOMENTS HD App for your iPad. You can easily create a photo book on your tablet which has a nice big screen, larger than your mobile phone, but still has the power of your laptop, without the bulkiness. Since there is a larger screen, this app is able to take advantage of such features as drag and drop.

screen480x480

The Kodak Moments HD app has unique features such as Smartfit technology that allows your images to be easily dragged and dropped into simple-to-use templates that automatically format. That way nothing important is lost from your images. You also get KODAK Perfect Touch Enhancement Technology for even better looking pictures.

You can pull your photos from Facebook, Instagram and Flickr. Or from your iPad camera roll. You know what I’m talking about. I have totally seen people on vacation in front of landmarks, holding their tablets up in the air, taking photos.

After you have made your photo book or selected your prints (while lounging on the couch or a lawn chair) you can send your order to a major retailer like Target or Bartell Drugs for pick-up. Or you can have it shipped to your home.

Screen Shot 2014-04-02 at 8.41.12 AM

So go and download the Kodak Moments HD App, try it out and let us know what you think.

Stay tuned for the Android version and new photo products like cards and calendars!

Introducing the Kodak Picture Kiosk Drone

Blog4

Have you ever found yourself on a remote mountain top, miles away from civilization, or even enjoying the comfort your own backyard and thought, “I really wish there was a Picture Kiosk here”?

Blog2

Kodak Alaris brings you the Kodak Picture Kiosk Drone. Now, with the new Kodak Picture Kiosk Drone, you can print your favorite pictures whenever you want, wherever you want.  It’s simple, just call 1-555- DroneMe to “phone drone”, text DroneMe to 5555 or use the handy Kodak Picture Kiosk Drone mobile app and within minutes our Picture Kiosk Drone will find you wherever you may be.

Blog1

Are you too busy to call?  Try our new “Cloud Service”. All you have to do is look up into the sky and when you see one of our yellow Picture Kiosk Drones flying overhead, climb onto the roof of your home, wave your arms frantically, and your prints will be ready in minutes.

Blog3

  • High Quality Color Prints that literally, “fall right out of the sky”.
  • Enjoy a cooling breeze while the Picture Kiosk Drone completes your order.
  • Accepts Cash, Credit and PayPal. (Bitcoin and heavy amounts of loose change are no longer accepted).
  • Makes prints from any image storage media, Camera Cards, Bluetooth, WIFI, USB (Please remember to disconnect your USB cable before the Picture Kiosk Drone takes off).
  • Try our new “Hands Free Selfie” feature.  Great for Passport photos too!
  • Coming Soon! The New Under Water Picture Kiosk…

Blog5

And remember, “If the Drone is not Yellow, it might not be that Mellow.”

Blog6

Note: Do not attempt to ride, avoid, or otherwise annoy the Picture Kiosk Drone.  Be sure to only use the Kodak Picture Kiosk Drone, another Drone may not be the Drone you are looking for.