Get organized with the Kodak Rapid Scanner II

On the list of top10 New Years resolutions, “Getting Organized” is number two. Was it on your list this year?

The end of January is when a lot of people have either given up on their resolutions or they are taking steps to reach their goals. If you had “Getting Organized” on your list here is something you can do and be able to cross something off!

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Gather up all your loose prints and shoeboxes of photos and head to a Kodak Picture Kiosk with a Kodak Rapid Print Scanner II. A Kodak Rapid Print Scanner II can scan your prints and turn them into digital files that you can use create photo products or Archive DVDs.

The Scanners are so easy to use that you can do it without the help of a sales assistant. They are fast too. You can feed the scanner stacks of 20 pictures at a time and it scans FIFTY 4×6 photos in about a MINUTE! You can also be assured that you will get great image clarity and color from the Kodak Rapid Print Scanner II.

Once you have your photos scanned and digitized you can create a photo book that organizes them however you please. An Archive DVD is a good way to store your photos and transfer them to your computer. You could even cross some other items off your to-do list and use your photos to make thank you cards or photo gifts like calendars.

Kodak Picture Kiosk and the Kodak Rapid Print Scanner II can take care of your printed photo collection so quickly it will assist you in the #10 top New Years resolution for 2014… Spend More Time with Family.

Find a Kodak Picture Kiosk with a Kodak Rapid Print Scanner II using this store locator.

Lightbox photography in the NYC subway: Current exhibit at Bowling Green Station

Today’s Film Friday post comes from  Lester Burg – Senior Manager, MTA Arts for Transit and Urban Design

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Lester Burg

 

Lightbox photography in the NYC subway: Current exhibit at Bowling Green Station

Sponsored by Kodak Alaris

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) moves 8.5 million people each day through its subways, buses and commuter rail systems.  Making art a part of the experience is important – it adds a humanizing element, provides an enhancement that is accessible to all, improves the visual environment and sets a tone that the system is cared for and the customers are considered.  Since travel involves moving people efficiently through various spaces, the more we can do to improve that experience, the better the spaces are treated and enjoyed.   Arts for Transit commissions permanent art in stations – and oversees poster, music and poetry programs as well, with the common goal of improving and enhancing the experience of the transit system. Photography is also offered within lightbox displays in stations where there was the space for a series of light box displays and which were rehabilitated in the past ten years.  The light boxes are in places with heavy foot traffic.

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MTA Arts for Transit curates the Lightbox Project, which showcases photography in large-scale in four key locations – Bowling Green, Bryant Park 42nd Street, Grand Central and Atlantic-Barclays Center in Brooklyn.  We try to find photographers whose work will hold the viewer’s interest over repeated viewings, and which has something to say about the neighborhood, the area or the people who use the station.  The program is made possible through the support of sponsors.  For this exhibit, the displays are printed on Kodak Professional Endura Transparency Display material with a local partner, the Prestone Media Group. We are unable to accept unsolicited photography proposals for the Lightbox Project.

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At Bowling Green, more than 25,000 people use the station on a daily basis, and many are international visitors heading to Ellis Island or the Statue of Liberty.  Other riders are office workers in Lower Manhattan.  At this location, we try to show a part of New York not often seen, or a way of expressing the City and travel through a photographer’s particular point of view.  People are fascinated by tall buildings and the dramatic way that Navid Baraty has shot the images is captivating.  The series features aerial views from atop skyscrapers in Manhattan, offering the viewer a look that is straight down.

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People will stop in their tracks and take a closer look – there is a lot of detail in these photos and the angle of looking downward takes a second to come into sharp focus.  Visitors spend more time looking at the images and people waiting for a train will study the art or photographs.  We always hear from people that they have noticed the photographs in the station and when it is your regular station the photos or artworks become part of the daily landscape.  Ideally, one notices a new detail every day.

- Lester Burg – Senior Manager , MTA Arts for Transit and Urban Design

CES – Drones, Phones and Wearabletech!

For those of you unfamiliar with CES it’s the annual Consumer Electronics show and the Hollywood of Tech. A glitzy VIP club for the latest shiny new things. It sends the press into hyperbole and brings out the techno-geek in all of us. Of course Las Vegas is the perfect backdrop – an incongruous fantasy world in the middle of the desert (a description that could apply equally to both show and city). The combination is quite overpowering, yet seductive enough to attract 150,000 visitors annually. After four shows I’m still not sure whether I love it or hate it – either way there’s no doubting its credentials to fuel the imagination in ways few other shows can match.

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The Strip at night.

2014 was the largest in history with 2 million square feet of exhibit space and over 3200 exhibitors. It is simply stellar in dimension. This year the pretty young things were hailed as wearable tech, drones, 3D printing, next gen smart phones and the Internet of Things to name a few. All exciting opportunities no doubt, but time will tell which live up to the promise. That 3D printing and wearable tech have been around for decades didn’t seem to matter; this year both technologies had evolved to a futuristic sexiness that demanded attention.

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South Hall Entrance

Wearables had been catapulted to stardom by the booming smartphone and app market and just needed the sensors to catch up. Perhaps I should be more interested in how long I’ve sat down and how many calories I’ve burnt, but what would I do with the information bar feel a little guilty about my second piece of toast? The real potential of wearable tech is still waiting in the wings. Imagine a comprehensive health monitor that diagnoses all manner of health problems before they arise – now that sounds useful, but still only scratching the surface as just about everything we use evolves into a connected network.

So we enter the surreal Internet of Things. A rather expansive term attributed to the British technologist Kevin Ashton, encapsulating the concept that everyday objects are now connecting to the internet. Each one uniquely identifiable, accessible, controllable and working silently in the background to make life better. (At least I hope that’s the outcome). And the machines manage themselves. M2M or Machine to Machine technology is growing with google-like determination, with IDC forecasting 212 billion connected things by 2020 and over 30billion autonomous things. Whether the thought of things controlling things without human intervention fills you with wonder or something less savory, it is going to happen and will be one of the biggest revolutions over the horizon. All part of the BIG DATA phenomenon.

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The LV Monorail – every 4 minutes to the show at peak times

3D printing in the home is an impossibly exciting prospect, but what would I print? It’s too slow and expensive for things that can be mass produced – if you wanted a new plastic fork, you’d just buy one. No, the value of 3D printing, at least in the short term, is to create something unique. The prototype and hobbyist market is booming whilst personalization of objects has yet to find mainstream appeal, but watch this space…!

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3D printed models (hand painted) at the 3D systems booth

And so to Kodak Alaris. This was our first CES as the new company. As I entered the foyer to the South Hall and climbed the escalator, a Kodak Moments sign hove into view. We had secured prime position at the hall entrance – it could not have been better sited.

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The Kodak Moments Print Place

The team was busy setting up an array of kiosks and mobile printing sales collateral. I continued on to our conference room suite and demo facilities in Hall 4 of the South Hall next to Google. (Incidentally – it is always a source of amazement to me how the show floor moves from utter mess to pristine overnight.)

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South Hall the day before opening.

Our show message was mobile. A third of the world’s population will have a smartphone with a hi-res camera by 2017 – already the preferred way of capturing planned as well as spontaneous photos. Gartner estimates total app downloads tripped past 100 billion in 2013. The number of digital images in existence is now estimated at over 2 trillion and growing fast. And each time we make it easier for consumers to print and do more with their images from smartphones we see a step change upwards in printing. Already we have accounts with over 20% of orders from Mobile devices. Our My Kodak Moments app passed 3 million downloads in December, and in October last year we took the bold step of allowing any developer to add Kodak printing capability to existing and new photo based apps with the launch of the Kodak Photo Service.  We now have seven partner apps live giving a total of 14million app downloads available to print.

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Image from CNN article 8th Jan 2014

Our message at the show was simple. You can now print easily from your mobile devices wherever you are – and the Kodak connected infrastructure and range of apps able to do this is growing all the time.

On the first day of the show the severe east coast weather was still making headlines. I was delayed a day travelling over and with 17,000 flights cancelled the prior week;there was no doubt early attendance was affected. It quickly picked up on Day two though as airlines worked their way through Atlantic quantities of de-icer and got the US moving again.

The lobby booth was a storming success and bustling with activity from dawn till dusk every day. Feedback was unanimously positive and we have a great opportunity to further expand our touchpoints, connected retail distribution and awareness. Our open platform mobile strategy in this space has been well received by press and customers alike and there is much to play for over the coming months.

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Karen Hoff –  in control at the lobby booth!

Finally I would like to thank our tireless team who really did a wonderful job in the planning and execution of our CES presence – it was a great success! The next show is the big one for our industry – Photokina, which takes place in September at Cologne. Look forward to sharing the experience as it happens, it’s sure to be a something special

Best wishes to all for 2014!

Darren

New Year’s Resolution: Do more with your photos

Twitter and Facebook has been full of posts about New Year’s resolutions. I was reading a friend’s blog post about goals for 2014 and noticed that “Take more pictures and do something with them” was on the list.

It might seem like we are taking more photos than ever with our mobile phone cameras always on hand along with Instagram and Facebook making it super easy to share them. But what do we do with all those photos?

At the beginning of the New Year I looked back over a lot of pictures from 2013 to write a recap post on my blog, make slideshows to post to Facebook and see how I did on my New Year’s goals. I think everyone would agree it’s a lot of fun to look at pictures whether they are from the past year or twenty years ago.

Do you have lots of photos that are buried on your hard drive? Trapped on your mobile phone? Why not set them free where you can enjoy them every day?

Display Your Pictures

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What better way to enjoy your photos than to put them on display in your home where you can see them all the time? There are so many options. Perhaps a formal wall arrangement where you can match the frames and photos or maybe create an eclectic arrangement.

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You don’t have to go with typical frames in a wall presentation. Try something like placing photos in an old window frame, tying them to a tree branch in a vase or clipping them to a wire strung across two nails. Not only is it a fun way to display photos but it makes it super easy to swap the photos out and refresh them each season or holiday.

Check out some of the home photo display ideas and projects featured on the Kodak Tips and Projects Center.

Tell a Story with Your Pictures

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Shoeboxes filled with photos have been replaced by computer folders full of jpegs. There really is no substitute for flipping through a real physical album of photos. You can tell a story with your photos and captions in a photo book and then it’s there on your book shelf or coffee table ready to relive at any moment.

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Your stories don’t have to be grand adventures either. It’s not just vacations and weddings that can be recorded in a photo book. Something as simple as the season for your garden or your child’s baseball team can make a great subject for a photo book.

Here are some tips for telling stories through photo books to help get you started.

Photo-CollageS

A really easy and quick way to tell a story with your photos is with a collage. There are so many ways you can enjoy a collage print of a collection of photos from a party, outing or just an afternoon outside. Hang it on your fridge or brighten a wall at the office.

Use Your Pictures

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Put your pictures to work and then you get to appreciate them every time you use them. Like with these photo bottle cap magnets. Bills and reminders are so much more pleasant when they are being held up by a smiling family member’s photo.

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Get creative with your photos. Use them for napkin rings, cupcake toppers, or gift tags.

Check out some of the fun ways you can be using your photos here.

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Do you stand in the card aisle looking for just the right card with just the right message? Why not make your own? Nothing is more personal than a photo card with your OWN picture and message. Not only for Valentine’s Day or Mother’s Day but consider using your photos for thank you cards, invitations and congratulations.

Don’t forget about giving photos as gifts. Whether it’s a photo book or a framed print, it’s a gift your friends and family will love and look at for years to come.

Hopefully these ideas get your mind going.

Kodak Picture Kiosk, the My Kodak Moments mobile app, and My Kodak Moments Facebook app are there to help you reach your photo resolutions for 2014!