Cole Barash, Iceland and Kodak Film

On the very first portrait Cole Barash went to shoot for his feature on Iceland, “64.133 ºN/21.9333 ºW” in this month’s Relapse Magazine, one of his lights blew up.  Blew. Up.

“Yeah, it’s not like you’re able to run to Adorama and pick up a new light,” said Barash. “So I just stripped my kit to basically a one-light set up with a fill option. It pushed me a little bit to use just that and not have so many options. OK.”

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At 25, Barash has photographed campaigns for Adidas, Nike, Rag and Bone, Brixton and Burton. A die-hard film user, Barash’s laid-back persona belies the strength of his creative vision, his disciplined approach to photography and respect for the medium and its history. That drew Relapse Editor Ian Frisch to his work.

“The concept of film in relationship to his photography even furthers my view of him as a true photographer,” said Frisch. “Rather than picking up the newest and flashiest equipment, Cole utilizes the history and foundations of photography, in a physical sense, to capture moments in a way that people have been doing for decades that, in some instances, the younger generation has lost touch with. His passion for photography, across the board, is something that is very rare now-a-days, and something that I hold in the highest respect.”

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Barash headed to Iceland with 100 rolls of film to shoot a personal project. When Frisch heard about Barash’s trip, he asked him to do a shoot for Relapse featuring the increasingly influential arts and fashion scene in Iceland. Relapse, founded in 2012, showcases edgy, progressive fashion photography and provocative culture journalism.

With not a lot of time or pre-planning, Barash moved quickly to find and create compelling portraits of designers and artists who make up this community and culture.  That same creative vision and work ethic he uses in the back bowls of Canada worked in the studios of Reykjavík.

“Shooting snowboarding out in the back country has taught me a lot. You can’t exactly run 200 feet through waist deep snow to go check an angle,” said Barash. “You really start to put yourself in that 200 foot position and how it’s going to frame up and what it’s going to look at. You need to go find the best angle quick.”

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In Iceland, when shooting designers, “as soon as I got into their studio, I made some quick decisions on how their brand and how they as a person would be interpreted to me – light and flashy, dark and moody, vibrant and atrocious.”

For the bands, Barash wanted to create photographs that conveyed the feeling of Iceland, as well as the band members themselves.

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In all cases, Barash moved fast – deciding how he wanted to shoot, the tools he would use to shoot and the need to focus his energy on making a connection with the subjects.

“I knew the tools I had and what I could do with them. I kind of quickly made decisions about the environment – where I wanted to shoot them and how I wanted to light it. Then I just started shooting.”

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Barash shot mostly with KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA 160, with a bit of  KODAK PROFESSIONAL TRI-X thrown in.

“I love the tones on PORTRA, especially on the skin – I haven’t found anything better,” said Barash. “It’s very soft and fairly muted, but not so muted it feels desaturated; very good contrast.”

“TRI-X – generally the contrast and the grain is pretty spot on for what I like to shoot. Especially when you start developing different filters and process,” said Barash. “I think I’ve been shooting it for so long that I know how something’s going to look on a negative.”

The latest issue of Relapse Magazine is available now in New York at Barnes and Noble Union Square, Soho International News, McNally Jackson Bookstore, Lafayette Smokeshop, Bouwerie Iconic, and Bedford Exotics in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. It is also available through the iTunes Store on all participating mobile devices.

For more on Cole Barash, visit

ColeBarash.com

Nomadda.tumblr.com

Instagram: @nomadda.

And for more on Relapse Magazine, visit

http://relapsemag.com.

Instagram: @relapsemagazine

Michael Raso: For the Love of Film – The 2013 FPP Walking Workshop

Today’s Film Friday blog post comes from Michael Raso

This past April 12-14, more than 50 film-minded professional and amateur photographers converged on the town of Findlay, Ohio to attend the first official mid-west Film Photography Project (FPP) Walking Workshop.  It was a fluid, fun weekend of casual instructions on all formats of traditional photography including 35mm, 120, 4×5 and 8×10, perfectly complemented by Kodak film.

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I wanted attendees to use some Kodak films that I shoot.  If you haven’t used it yet, PORTRA 800 is a beautiful addition to the PORTRA 160 and PORTRA 400 line of film. I’ve been shooting PORTRA 800 and wanted to share this experience with our attendees.  And, with so many Film Photography Podcast listeners shooting Kodak Tri-X film, I was thrilled to put rolls of Kodak T-Max 100 and 400 in their hands. The Kodak T-Max BW films are the sharpest BW films on the planet!

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The Findley, Ohio FPP Walking Workshop attendees were an amazing, diverse group of men and women of all ages. It was especially awesome to see 30-year Kodak veteran Dale Deven assisting a student on how to load a 35mm Leica camera. Previous FPP meet-ups, held in New York and London, were the inspiration for Findley’s more structured and instructional event – our biggest successes to date.

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Why shoot film in a world gone digital, you might ask?  For me, film remains the best and most satisfying medium.  I love the aesthetic, the process…and creating tangible assets I can archive.  I’m so glad that I’m not the only person that feels that way.

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In 2009, I launched the Film Photography Project (FPP) as an Internet radio show. With my years of broadcast experience, I thought that a radio show about film would be lots of fun. I had no idea that thousand upon thousands of people who were also as excited about film would be regularly tuning in. The podcast soon became a source of inspiration and discovery for both my listeners and me. Not only was I using medium format and large formats for the first time but those tuning in were also sharing and learning as fast as episodes could be recorded and posted.  My YouTube channel of instructional videos followed shortly thereafter, as did the Film Photography Project website, an online resource for film shooters worldwide.  Now, with the FPP Walking Workshops facilitating instruction and exploration of film with film enthusiasts directly, what better way to spend the weekend than with other film-loving people?

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The Film Photography Projects offers ongoing educational blogs, videos and podcasts about using film via the website http://filmphotographyproject.com/

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If you’re interested in trying film for the first time, trying a bigger film format or even developing at home, please do visit our podcast archive. E-mail inquiries or questions: Podcast@FilmPhotographyProject.com

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Photos by Lance King, Leslie Lazenby, Mat Marrash and Michael Raso shot on Kodak Portra 400 and Tri-X Film.

Michael Raso is a photographer, producer and filmmaker working professionally in the visual arts for over 20 years; Michael is also the founder of the Film Photography Project and its fortnightly Internet radio show, the Film Photography Podcast. Michael’s goal?…to get as many people as possible to experience the joys of shooting with traditional film! 

Kodak Picture Kiosk at 21 Stories for Scouts

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Sucessful rappellers sign the 21 Stories for Scouts poster

The Rochester Boy Scouts have an interesting way to raise money to support urban scouting. They invite the community to rappel down 21 stories in exchange for a donation. 21 Stories for Scouts is an opportunity of a lifetime and Kodak volunteered at the event to help create memories the rappellers will be able relive and share.

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A rappeller makes the trip down the side of the First Federal Plaza building

The rappelling took place on the First Federal Plaza building in downtown Rochester. A skilled team was brought in to provide equipment, training and logistics. In addition, Kodakers were there to take photos and print them for the participants.

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Kodak volunteers: Dan Olean, Dick Tuyn, Rich McNeary & Tom Maurer

We had Dan and Rich on the roof taking photos of the rappellers while Dick and Tom were on the 19th floor printing them out in a collage template.

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Chuck Rudd setting up the Kodak Picture Kiosks

All the way at the bottom on the street, Chuck and I manned two Kodak Picture Kiosks where we printed photos for friends and family taking shots with their cameras. We also made extra prints taken by our photographers.

By the time a rappeller got to the bottom of the building and back up to the top to return the equipment, we had photos waiting for them. How did we do this?

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The planning map for the photo transfer logistics

We have some skilled folks at Kodak and they planned out this impressive process for routing the photos wirelessly from the cameras on the roof to the Kodak Picture Kiosk on the 19th floor for the collages and then by cable 300 feet down to the two Kiosks on the ground. When these guys do a job… they go all out!

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The hole on the 19th floor where we ran cables 300 feet down to the other 2 Kiosks

I was mighty impressed with the team’s work. I don’t think any other charity rappelling event is as well documented or has a photo system like ours!

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Rappeller Amy and her brother Adam who is involved with the Seneca Waterways Scouts

It was a treat to be down on the street with the rappeller’s friends and family. They were all so excited for their rappellers and delighted that they could print out the photos they had taken right on the Kodak Picture Kiosk.

We saw all sorts of cameras. SLRs with huge lenses, point and shoot cameras and yes… a lot of people were taking pictures with their phones. That was no problem for us! After a quick download of the Kodak Connect mobile app, we were even able to print pictures from people’s phones!

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Using the Kodak Picture Kiosk we were able to pull a still photo of Valerie rappelling from video her husband shot

When the rappellers came out onto the street to rejoin their group, they were even more excited about the pictures that captured their accomplishment.

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Me, geared up and ready to go!

As a volunteer, I had the opportunity to rappel, and I jumped at it.

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My coworkers reminded me they would be snapping away so I better keep smiling the entire way down.

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The first step is the hardest, when you hang over the edge, before your first step.

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Once you get going, you just settle in and work your way down!

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Me silhouetted against the Times Square Building and the top structure “Wings of Progress”

It was an incredible view!

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A collage of my rappelling descent

This event was a great way to raise funds and awareness for the Boy Scouts. It’s a chance of a lifetime for the rappellers and I am glad Kodak was able to be there to help them remember it for days to come!

Mother’s Day Photo Inspiration

You know your Mom would love a card from you for Mother’s Day.

And you know she would really treasure a photo card with a personalized message.

But what photo do you put on the card?! Here are a few ideas.

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Scan in an old photo of you and your mom for your photo card.

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The “vintage” photo looks nice on a card and the memories will choke up your mom.

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Are you a dad helping the kids make a card for mom? Have the kids post with letters that spell out M-O-M or I love you. You could also have them make a sign to hold, write it on a chalkboard or even spell it out with their limbs and bodies!

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Note that my card had M-O-M spelled out by pets. Don’t forget Pet Moms too!

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Some other ideas for Dad’s “helping” the kids make a card – use a card of your children when they were babies. Or take a shot of little kid shoes next to Mom’s shoes. You could even scan in a drawing your child created of Mom and use that in a card!

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Don’t forget Grandma on Mother’s Day! A card that shows all the generations makes a sweet and memorable card. If you don’t have a good photo of Mom and kids, an appointment with a professional photographer for a photo session would make an amazing Mother’s Day gift.

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Plus you are in luck! Here is a coupon offer for Buy One Card Get One FREE at Kodak Picture Kiosk! Make Mom a couple cards or cover both Grandmas!

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This Mother’s Day, MomStart is hosting a blogger Kodak Picture Kiosk party at a Bartell Drugs in Seattle! Read about the fun they are going to have on her blog! We can’t wait to see what everyone makes at Kodak Picture Kiosk!

Exclusive Bonnie Marcus Mother’s Day cards at Target

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Now through Mother’s Day, you can find exclusive Bonnie Marcus Collection cards at Target through Kodak Picture Kiosk.

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“We love our partnership with Bonnie. She is a ‘mom-preneur’ who combines her experience in fashion and entertainment to create a sophisticated line of stationery that will be a keepsake for moms nationwide,” said Garth Neenan, Regional Business Manager, US & C Personal Imaging Division, Kodak.  “Consumers can create these one-of-a-kind cards, ensuring Mother’s Day is made even more special with a signature card from one of the leading designers of greeting cards and stationery.”

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“It’s an amazing opportunity to continue to work with Kodak, such an iconic brand known for preserving family memories in special and lasting ways,” said Bonnie Marcus.  “I  love creating designs that I, as a mother, would want to receive, and that I know will put a smile on the face of countless other Moms on May 12.  Every mom treasures a card that features her own family/children!”

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To help you make Mother’s Day really memorable we are offering a Buy One Get One free folded 5×7 card offer by downloading a coupon at http://kodak.ly/momd13

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Film’s Not Dead Store and Film Photography Gallery

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Back in 2010, three friends and lovers of film photography, Charlie Abiss, Tori Khambhaita and Jamie Rothwell got together and formed the Film’s not Dead (FND) group. They intended to bring together like-minded photographers who enjoy the benefits that film photography offers and to provide information on film availability within the UK, while sharing imaginative, thought provoking images.

Today FND has nearly 5000 followers on Facebook and has a regular stall in London’s famous Brick Lane market. Due to that success, FND has yesterday opened a permanent store and film photography gallery in the West End of London.

Fans and followers of the Film’s not Dead page enjoy discussions, take part in exciting competitions – such as ones from Kodak ourselves, and locate nearby venues where people can buy film or have film developed.

Now with the opening of a new store and gallery, FND will offer film photographers and fans so much more. Each month, on the upper floor, the gallery will host a collection of images shot on film by professional and amateur photographers. To launch the new space, Film’s not Dead is proud to open its new store and gallery with a collection from one of its own, Tori Khambhaita, with her unique “Printers” exhibition, which was shot using Kodak’s Tri-X film.

Tori’s ‘Printers’ project gained national press and won her the coveted title of Young Black and White photographer of the year 2012.  This isn’t only a photographic show; it’s an awe-inspiring exhibition of skills and the unseen faces that have powered London’s photographic printing industry for decades.

Dennis Watson - ® Tori Khambhaita

Dennis Watson – ® Tori Khambhaita

Tori has created something truly original, which bridges the gap between the prints and the printers. The prints are truly one off’s, as each printer in the shots has illustrated their creativity and style, which can never be duplicated. This exhibition not only shows you the faces behind the London print industry, it also shows the skills behind those faces.

Klaus Kalde - ® Tori Khambhaita

Klaus Kalde – ® Tori Khambhaita

Tori, who works with some of the featured printers, gained exclusive access to the darkrooms of her subjects. After photographing either inside or outside of the darkroom, she herself would return to Klaus Kalde’s, where she would develop her own rolls of film.

Lee Williams - Raipd Eye - ® Tori Khambhaita

Lee Williams – Raipd Eye – ® Tori Khambhaita

Upon developing the negatives, Tori returned to the printers themselves and asked them to reflect their personal styles and preferences in the final image, again making each photograph unique.  Some have chosen to stay safe whilst others have gone all out, which will leave the viewer wide eyed and open mouthed asking ‘how?’.

Nick Jones - Photofusion - ® Tori Khambhaita

Nick Jones – Photofusion – ® Tori Khambhaita

Aside from the prints Tori also asked these highly skilled craftsmen to state the story that preceded them. These handwritten anecdotes beautifully entwine to create an absolutely fabulous narrative of life within London’s photographic printing industry.

Robin Bell - ® Tori Khambhaita

Robin Bell – ® Tori Khambhaita

This show is a testament to all that support traditional photography and recognise the years of acquired skill it takes to call yourself a darkroom printer. Tori’s exhibition and images celebrates the master craftsmanship and style of these artists committed to traditional photographic printing. The knowledge of the featured men and women in the photographs have acquired on their journey is invaluable! Tori’s ‘Printers’ exhibition will run from 3rd May 2013 – 28th May 2013 at the new Film’s not Dead gallery and store.

Film’s not Dead
13 Mount Pleasant
London
WC1X 0AR

Opening Times: Mon – Fri: 11.00 – 6.00